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Strontium Side Effects are Overblown – Get the Facts

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What is Strontium?

Strontium is a mineral from the earth that is naturally found in your body in small amounts.

In fact, 99% of the total amount of strontium in the body is found in bone, a trait it shares with calcium.

Strontium Myths

Experts now believe strontium is, “an essential trace mineral necessary for the optimal normal development and accretion of peak bone mass, and the sustained health of our bones.”

Along with bone-building elements calcium and magnesium, strontium is a member of the elements in Group 2 on The Periodic Table – meaning it shares some similar chemical properties. Strontium is found in varying amounts throughout the world in the soil, and thus in plants grown in the soil, and in the water – so it is a natural part of our diet.

In the U.S., Canada and Europe, the typical diet contains 2–4 mg strontium/day. However, commercially-produced plant foods grown on fields using synthetic fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides have far lower levels of strontium than their organic counterparts.

Plus, it is well-known that our consumption of plant foods is far below recommended amounts – so it is unlikely you are getting sufficient strontium in your diet. To learn about the most strontium-rich foods, check out our Strontium Food Sources page.

Consumers of conventionally-grown foods are at risk of strontium deficiency, which, as you will soon see, is a factor that increases our risk of osteopenia/osteoporosis as we age.

However, you may have heard some less-than-confidence inspiring things about strontium. So I’m here to set the record straight…

3 Myths About Strontium

Having reviewed the published research on the different forms of strontium: natural strontium, the strontium ranelate drug, along with the radioactive form of strontium, I can confidently assure you that the natural form of strontium, strontium citrate, is a safe and effective bone health supporter. That goes for both the density and the tensile quality of your bones. (I’ll explain more in detail on how they differ shortly.)

But there are still several misconceptions about strontium citrate pills:

  • Strontium Increases Fracture Risk. Some strontium critics conclude that strontium causes the outer cortical bone to become thicker, reducing tensile strength (resistance to breaking under tension) and increasing the risk of fractures. However, peer-reviewed research shows otherwise.
  • Strontium Supplements Have Side Effects. Strontium has been painted a villain due to undesirable and serious side effects of one form, the drug, strontium ranelate…
  • Strontium Skews DEXA Results Too Much To Be Reliable. Since strontium is denser than calcium, it affects bone improvement readings on a DEXA scan. So, some question whether strontium is really increasing bone density or if improvements are just a false positive result.

Let’s take a closer, research-based look at each of them. You’ll soon see these misleading statements hold no weight.

But before we do that, it’s important to understand that there are different forms of strontium – and they all do different things…


The 3 Different Types of Strontium Salts You Should Know About

Strontium salt

Natural Strontium Salts

The element strontium is present in natural strontium salts. The most common stable strontium salts are strontium sulfate and strontium carbonate, which are found in soils, and strontium citrate which is used for nutritional supplements.

Stable strontium itself has never been found to cause any harmful effects — with one caveat: to maintain proper balance between calcium and strontium, more calcium than strontium must be consumed.

In more than 100 years of research on strontium, including a number of recent human studies discussed below, no adverse effects have been reported for any natural stable strontium salt when more calcium than strontium is consumed.

Natural strontium salts are safe (at reasonable dosages, of course) and highly beneficial.

Neither of the two forms discussed next are safe. In fact, each has harmful side effects…

Ranelate icon

Strontium Ranelate Drug

Strontium’s beneficial effects in the treatment of osteoporosis were reported way back in 1910 — but strontium products never entered the market back then due to confusion between the normal, stable forms of strontium with its radioactive isotopes. What everyone heard about was radioactive strontium for building atomic bombs – and no company was willing to launch healthful strontium products with public perception as it was.

But more recently, the poor track record and serious side effects of the osteoporosis drugs, renewed interest in the bone health benefits of strontium by the French pharmaceutical company, Servier.

Since natural minerals cannot be patented, Servier developed a chemical drug form of strontium called strontium ranelate. Servier now had a patentable, exclusive strontium bone drug which was sold beginning in the early 2000’s under the trade name ProtelosTM.

Ranelic acid is the synthetic compound used to create the unnatural strontium salt, strontium ranelate.

Unfortunately, this drug form of strontium is potentially harmful. For additional sources on its toxicity go to Toxin Profiles and the Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry.

Strontium Ranelate has a long list of adverse side-effects, starting with common ones like:

  • Nausea
  • Skin irritation
  • Fainting
  • Loose Stools
  • Headache

And less common, but possibly deadly effects like:

  • Venous thromboembolism
  • Serious autoimmune reactions, such as DRESS (the acronym for drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms)

Strontium Ranelate and Blood Clots

Overall, the likelihood that you will be among the ones affected may be small– although a review of the research on strontium ranelate published in 2005 states “Strontium [ranelate] caused a 50% increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (including pulmonary embolism).”

In the health information provided for medical professionals, Servier, the pharmaceutical company with the patent on strontium ranelate states:

“In Phase III studies, the annual incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) observed over 5 years was approximately .7%, with a relative risk of 1.4 in strontium ranelate treated patients as compared to placebo.”

In other words, over a 5-year period in the Phase III studies, each year, 7 of every 1,000 participants taking strontium ranelate developed VTE.

Saying that those taking strontium ranelate had a relative risk for VTE of 1.4 compared to placebo means that strontium ranelate increased risk for VTE by 40%.

Natural strontium citrate has never been found to increase risk of VTE.

Strontium Ranelate and DRESS Syndrome

Another potentially deadly side-effect of taking strontium ranelate is DRESS syndrome.

Symptoms of DRESS syndrome typically begin 1-8 weeks after exposure to the medication. Classic symptoms include widespread rash, fever, and involvement of one or more internal organs.

Approximately 50% of patients will have hepatitis (liver inflammation), 30% will have eosinophilia (high levels of white cells in the blood indicating immune system activation), 10% will have nephritis (inflamed kidneys), and 10% will have pneumonitis (inflamed lungs).

DRESS syndrome is often severe and can result in death if not diagnosed early – for which reason, you’re urged to see your doctor immediately if you develop a rash after taking strontium ranelate.

Another important note:

The use of strontium ranelate has never been approved in the U.S. or Canada and is now significantly restricted in Europe, while strontium citrate is freely available.

Radioactive icon

Radioactive Strontium

Radioactive strontium is formed in nuclear reactors or during the explosion of nuclear weapons.

Therapeutically, radioactive strontium is used to treat metastatic cancer but can damage bone marrow and act as a potential carcinogen itself at high doses.

Radioactive strontium isotopes (85Sr and 89 Sr) are also used as delivery agents for chemotherapy drugs and for diagnostic purposes in kinetic studies. (Kinetics is the study of the rate at which chemical processes occur.) Radioactive strontium is not sold as supplements!

Radioactive strontium, which shows up in imaging and is easily traced, is often substituted for calcium in kinetic research because strontium and calcium behave very much alike in the human body.

All forms of strontium and calcium have strong bone-seeking properties, and both share common transport pathways, so they compete for absorption in the intestines and for reabsorption in the kidneys.

I want to underscore here that this is a competition that calcium always wins, which explains why:

  • Strontium cannot displace calcium when adequate supplies of calcium are present.
  • Strontium supplements should be taken at a different time of day from calcium, or else little, if any, strontium will be absorbed.

Ok, now that you see the differences in the 3 main types of strontium, let’s dig into the common misconceptions surrounding this valuable mineral.

Myth #1: Strontium Increases Fracture Risk

Some strontium critics claim that strontium causes cortical bone to become thicker, and since cortical bone is less flexible, may increase risk of fractures.

The scientific facts are so different from these assertions, it’s unclear why they publish such misinformation.

The very tiny amount of strontium ions that deposit in our bones prefer to do so in trabecular, not cortical bone.

Trabecular bone is the soft, spongy, more metabolically-active inner portion of our bones. Cortical bone is their hard, outer layer. If your bones were M&Ms, cortical bone would be the outer candy shell and trabecular bone the soft chocolate center.

trabecular vs cortical

Some strontium critics assert that strontium deposits primarily in cortical bone and that somehow translates into reduced bone strength.

They base their claims on these 2 studies:

  1. Boivin, Deloffre, Perrat, et al.. Strontium distribution and interactions with bone mineral in monkey iliac bone after strontium salt (S 12911) administration. J Bone Miner Res. 1996 Sep;11(9):1302-11.
  2. Blake and GM, Fogelman I. (2006 JBMR 21(9) 1417-24 Strontium ranelate: a novel treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review of safety and efficacy. Clin Interv Aging. 2006;1(4):367-75.

But in both cases the authors of the studies drew POSITIVE conclusions about strontium’s bone supporting role, yet the uncredentialed author of the website drew negative conclusions!

Here is the researcher’s conclusion for the first study:

“In conclusion, taken up by bone, Strontium … induced no major modifications of the bone mineral at the crystal level. As a result, a treatment with Strontium should not induce any alteration of bone mineral.”

Nowhere in the above study, is it proposed that strontium is weakening bone.

The second study (Blake and Fogelman) drew this conclusion:

“Strontium … is the only treatment proven to be effective at preventing both vertebral and hip fractures in women aged 80 y and over.”

Again, the study says nothing about strontium weakening bone structure. And neither study shows strontium depositing primarily into cortical bone. It doesn’t. Strontium primarily deposits in trabecular bone.

The new-forming bone in the trabecular part of your bones is far more active and incorporates more strontium ions than the cortical bone. Cortical bone also accumulates far more slowly. So its incorporation of strontium – which is less than 1 strontium ion for every 100 calcium ions even in trabecular bone – is even less than cortical bone.

What the research shows is that strontium, in addition to its numerous beneficial effects that boost osteoblast and slow osteoclast activity, also indirectly inhibits resorption of the calcified bone matrix by stabilizing hydroxyapatite crystals.

Another fact: strontium is the only trace mineral present in human bone whose level in bone correlates with bone compressive strength, i.e., resistance to fracture.

The bottom line is: Strontium citrate improves healthy bone mineralization and resistance to fracture.


Strontium Myths

Myth #2: Strontium Supplements Have Side Effects

The drug, strontium ranelate, has a long list of side effects, and since the drug has much more media exposure than the health supplement strontium citrate, the two are often confused.

Most blogs, websites, and even doctors do not know that strontium citrate is a completely different molecule from strontium ranelate. Equating them is like suggesting sodium chloride (table salt) and sodium bicarbonate (baking powder) are the same. They both contain sodium, but when you connect that sodium molecule to another molecule, its actions are completely different!

Another issue to consider is that the strontium ranelate drug, Protelos, contains Aspartame – an ingredient which is known for causing reactions on its own.

Natural strontium citrate has never been found to cause any harmful effects– with one caveat: to maintain proper balance between calcium and strontium, more calcium than strontium must be consumed, preferably twice as much calcium.


Myth #3: Strontium Skews DEXA Results Too Much To Be Reliable

The common myth is that strontium supplementation results in larger concentrations of strontium in your bones. And more strontium in your bone causes the DEXA to overstate your bone density increase.

The truth is, strontium does weigh much more than calcium, and its mass does impact DEXA readings…but only a little.

Strontium Myths

Strontium has nearly twice the atomic weight of calcium.

Because of this difference in mass, strontium’s substitution for calcium weakens X-ray penetration during DEXA scanning and results in overestimation of BMD. But strontium ions replaces less than one calcium ion out of 10, so the overestimation is not great enough to discount DEXA results showing improvements in BMD.

The latest science shows your result may be overstated by 8.5% – 11.2%. But don’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Even after adjusting your score down by about 10%, an increase in bone density is still an increase!

For example, if you gained a modest 1% after taking strontium and you reduce that score by 10%, you STILL GAINED .9% of new bone. That’s a big win when you normally would have been losing bone density!

Don’t be fooled by the strontium critics. The increased density in the strontium studies (including the AlgaeCal studies) are still outright increases in bone density in older adults who should be losing bone. And increased bone density is closely correlated with lowered risk of breaking a bone.

Besides, strontium has been shown to reduce fracture risk independent of bone density. In other words, whether your bone density increases or not, strontium reduces your risk of breaking a bone!

You’ll understand why strontium works as it does when you read the list of strontium’s bone-building effects on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. (I will be publishing a post on its positive bone-building mechanisms in the near future.)

woman put effervescent tablet in glass

Deciding on Dosage

How much supplemental strontium do you need for healthy bones?

If you have low bone density, you will receive the most benefit from a 680 milligram per day dose of strontium citrate.

This is the dose that has been used in almost all the human research conducted on stable strontium salts. (It’s also the same dose of strontium citrate provided by 2 capsules of bone-building Strontium Boost.)

If your bones are currently in great shape, you may still wish to consider supplementing with strontium citrate at a dose of 340 milligrams per day. This dose will help protect and maintain the long-term health of your bones.

A personal note: this is my situation. Within a year after I began supplementing with AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost (680 mg strontium citrate daily), my bones were completely healthy. My DEXA results were excellent, showing bones in the healthy, normal range, where they have remained, which I credit in large part to taking AlgaeCal Plus, Strontium Boost and, since it became available, Triple Power Omega 3 Fish Oil.

(You can read about my journey from rapidly advancing osteopenia in my early 40s back to healthy bones)

After two years of excellent DEXA results, I thought I no longer needed extra help and stopped taking Strontium Boost.

But now, after my in-depth review of the current research on strontium – which involved reading more than 70 recently published papers in the peer-reviewed medical literature – I am convinced that strontium citrate has so much to offer that will help ensure my bones remain healthy that I’ve begun supplementing with Strontium Boost again!

Now, however, I’m taking a prophylactic (preventive) dose of 340 milligrams per day, which I also recommended to my husband to help keep his knees healthy, so, at 69 he can keep playing basketball with men half his age.

What is strontium’s optimal dosage?

In the most recently published studies in which the effects of natural strontium salts on bone health were researched, strontium citrate was effectively absorbed and deposited in bone at both a 340 mg per day and a 680 mg per day dose.

It should be noted that:

  • The studies showing a 340 mg daily dose of strontium citrate was effective were quite small, including just 10 osteopenic and/or osteoporotic women.
  • Participants in a much larger study in which the 680 mg per day dose was used — 172 women who were followed for a period of 7 years — were taking not only strontium citrate (Strontium Boost), but also AlgaeCal Plus. So, all the credit for the highly significant gains in BMD seen every year — which averaged +1.04% per year over the 7-years — cannot be attributed solely to strontium. However, because strontium is the only mineral that both lowers the rate of bone resorption and promotes the rate at which new bone is built, it’s obvious that strontium contributed to the exceptional results seen in this 7-year study.
  • It’s also vitally important to recognize that THERE IS NO SINGLE MAGIC BONE-BUILDING BULLET! Building bone requires a nutrient “team effort”! You’ll achieve optimal results when you combine strontium citrate and ALL 12 of the other essential bone-building nutrients. These are: calcium; magnesium; boron; copper; manganese; silicon; nickel; selenium; phosphorus; potassium; vanadium; and zinc. And you’ll need vitamins D3; K2 (in the form of MK-7); and C too. That’s why you’ll be taking all of these bone-essentials when you follow the AlgaeCal protocol (thanks to the Bone Builder Pack)

Avoid consuming calcium for at least 2 hours before taking strontium

As explained above, calcium will be preferentially absorbed over strontium. Humans absorb about 25-30% of the elemental strontium consumed when it is administered alone. But if strontium is taken at the same time of calcium, our absorption of strontium is reduced to just 15-18% if it’s taken with calcium. So it’s important that you take the two minerals at least 2 hours apart.

In additional to calcium-containing foods, foods that contain alginate (found in kelp) lower strontium absorption, and so do certain medications, including quinolone antibiotics, and medications that contain aluminum hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide.

For at least 2 hours before and after taking your strontium citrate supplement, avoid consuming:

  • Supplements containing calcium.
  • Foods naturally rich in calcium: such as dairy products (cow’s milk, cheese, yogurt, kefir), bone broth, sardines, spinach, kale, collard greens, turnip greens, mustard greens, beet greens, watercress.
  • Foods fortified with calcium: such as calcium-fortified almond, rice and soy milks, tofu, calcium-fortified orange juice and other fruit juices.
  • Kelp: Alginate, which is found in kelp, reduces strontium absorption so greatly that it is used to prevent strontium toxicity in cases of radioactive strontium poisoning. Alginate is a thickening agent used in sauces, yogurt, puddings and pies.
  • Quinolone antibiotics: like calcium, strontium is likely to form complexes with quinolones in the gastrointestinal tract, preventing absorption of the antibiotic. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, the quinolones include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), gatifloxacin (Tequin), and others.
  • Medications that contain calcium: such as calcium-containing antacids and oral tetracyclines. Calcium-containing antacids include calcium carbonate (Tums & others), dihydroxyaluminum sodium carbonate (Rolaids & others). Tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Vibramycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin, Sumycin).
  • Antacids that contain aluminum hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide: both can reduce absorption of strontium by 20-25%. Antacid medications that contain aluminum or magnesium hydroxide include magaldrate (Riopan), Amphojel, and aluminum hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide combinations (Maalox, Mylanta, others).
  • Chelating agents: It is not uncommon for people over age 50 to have accumulated high levels of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium and/or lead. If you have been found to have high levels of heavy metals and have been prescribed an oral chelating agent, such as DMSA, take strontium citrate 3-4 hours before or after consuming your chelating medication.

At this point, you’re probably wondering…


When to Take Strontium Citrate

What schedule can help me optimize strontium absorption and let me lead a normal life? I suggest the following:

  • AlgaeCal Plus: 2 capsules with breakfast
  • AlgaeCal Plus: 2 capsules with lunch
  • Strontium Boost: 2 capsules right before bed (on an empty stomach)

how to take Algaecal Plus and Strontium Boost

Print your own How to Take Your AlgaeCal Supplements PDF.

Why this regimen?

It is best to take strontium supplements and calcium at different times of day to get the most benefit.

Take your strontium before bedtime at night. It has been suggested that bone resorption is most active at night, so taking strontium citrate just before bed may result in strontium exerting more of its antiresorptive effects when they are needed most.

Strontium can be taken with or without food. Just be sure the food does not contain calcium.

Calcium on the other hand, should be taken with food so that when food nutrients are being metabolised, the calcium absorption happens along with the other nutrients in the same digestive phase.

Both the strontium and the calcium supplements are absorbed in our gastrointestinal tracts using the same mechanism. Thus, if we take both the supplements together or at the same time, the two will compete for absorption by the body. Scheduling your supplementation like above, will ensure that this does not happen.

What Else Can Be Done To Optimize Strontium Citrate Absorption?

How to boost your ability to absorb strontium and get the most from your strontium supplement…

Our active intestinal absorption of strontium is vitamin D-dependent and decreases with aging, and with consumption of phosphate additives as well as calcium.

You can further optimize your absorption of strontium by:

Ensuring your intake of vitamin D3 is adequate

What’s “adequate” vitamin D3? Sufficient to bring your blood level of 25(OH)D into the 50-80 ng/mL range. 25(OH)D is the vitamin D form circulating in the bloodstream and the marker typically used to assess vitamin D levels. Ask your doctor to get tested to know your current levels and how much you need to bring your levels up to the healthy range.

Avoiding consumption of processed foods

Phosphate, as well as calcium, significantly lowers strontium absorption. Phosphate additives are used as preservatives in most processed foods, including sodas (regular and diet sodas), breads, rolls, sweet bakery products, tortillas, cereals, savory snacks, crackers, snack/meal bars, pizza, poultry, cured meats, vegetables (processed, not fresh!), egg products (e.g., Egg beaters, powdered eggs), seafood, and candy (including chocolate). Read labels!

healthy habit - smelling flowers

Strontium Safety Issues

Individuals with chronic kidney disease

Strontium is eliminated by our kidneys, so it may accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease, as their kidneys’ ability to filter the blood is compromised.

In patients with chronic renal failure, blood levels of strontium are increased four-fold when creatinine clearance is less than 50 mL/minute. Supplemental strontium should be avoided in individuals with a creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/minute or who are on dialysis. A creatinine clearance rate of 90 or greater indicates normal healthy kidney function. A creatinine clearance rate of 60-89 indicates the initial stage of kidney disease.

Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine phosphate in muscle; it’s usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body and is eliminated in urine. How quickly our kidneys filter creatinine from the bloodstream, which is called the creatinine clearance rate, provides a measure of how effectively your kidneys are filtering your blood. (The creatinine clearance rate is also called the glomerular filtration rate because tiny capillaries in the basic structural and functional unit of the kidney, the nephron, are called glomerular capillaries.)

Bone levels of strontium are often high in chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis

People with chronic kidney disease are less able to remove waste and excess water from the blood. Dialysis is a way of carrying out this process. Dialysis fluid can contain high concentrations of strontium, so not surprisingly, some dialysis patients are known to have elevated bone strontium concentrations and a high strontium/calcium ratio in bone. As a result, about 5% of dialysis patients develop osteomalacia (softening of the bones).

However, osteomalacia is also frequently seen in end-stage kidney failure patients who are not yet on dialysis and who have normal bone strontium levels. The reasons for this are that failing kidneys lose their ability to:

  • Activate vitamin D (vitamin D is converted into its active, hormonal form in the kidneys –which is the form in which vitamin D helps us absorb calcium from the digestive tract)
  • Re-absorb calcium passing through the kidneys in the bloodstream instead of losing it in urine

So, if you are on dialysis or have end stage of kidney failure, ask your doctor for advice on whether to proceed with strontium supplementation.

Key Takeaways From This Article

  • Strontium delivers a unique combination of bone health benefits no other nutrient provides. Strontium is the only mineral in our bones that both lowers the rate of bone resorption and promotes the rate at which new bone is built.
  • Three types of strontium salts are in use today: (1) Natural stable strontium, e.g., strontium citrate, (2) Unnatural stable pharmaceutical strontium called strontium ranelate, and (3) Radioactive (unstable) strontium.
  • Natural strontium salts, (strontium citrate), are safe (at the dosages discussed above and when twice as much calcium is consumed as strontium) and highly beneficial; neither strontium ranelate nor radioactive (unstable) strontium is safe.
  • Strontium ranelate comes with risks of unwanted side effects. The long list of adverse side-effects attributed to strontium – ranging from commonly seen adverse effects like nausea and skin irritation to possibly deadly effects like venous thromboembolism and serious autoimmune reactions, such as DRESS – are caused by ranelic acid (the “ranelate” portion of strontium ranelate), not strontium.
  • The use of strontium ranelate has never been approved in the U.S. and is now significantly restricted in Europe, while strontium citrate is freely available.
  • Don’t worry about strontium taking the place of calcium in your bones. Strontium and calcium share a common carrier system in the intestinal wall, which will always choose to carry calcium rather than strontium from our digestive tract into our bloodstream. Strontium competes with calcium for absorption – and calcium wins every time. Also, strontium is eliminated more readily than calcium from kidneys.
  • Strontium is almost twice as large as calcium, and its larger size impacts DEXA readings. Available data indicate that approximately 10% of the increase seen in BMD is due to strontium’s larger size – which also means that 90% of the increase seen in BMD is accurate. Besides, strontium has been shown to reduce fracture risk independent of bone density. In other words, whether your bone density increases or not, strontium reduces your risk of breaking a bone!
  • Strontium’s beneficial effects are not due to its replacing calcium in your bones. They are the result of strontium’s bone-building effects on a very wide range of key molecules involved in bone remodeling.
  • Strontium increases our ability to absorb and deposit calcium in our bones– yes, calcium. And that’s another reason why the Bone Builder Pack of AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost have not only slowed bone loss, but built new bone for the thousands of people who’ve tried it.

Author: Lara Pizzorno, MDIV, MA, LMT

Best-selling author of “Your Bones: How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis and Have Strong Bones for Life – Naturally” and a member of the American Medical Writers Association with 30+ years of experience specializing in bone health. Lara is the Editor of Longevity Medicine Review (www.lmreview.com) as well as a Senior Medical Editor for SaluGenecists Inc., and Integrative Medicine Advisors, LLC.

Comments

  1. Jannine
    Jannine

    Hello Lara, thank you for the information you have provided on this site. I have learned quite a bit about strontium citrate, including how/when to take it. I took the strontium citrate via a supplement through Orth Molecular called “0ro Bono”. That supplement is broken up into “AM” and “PM” formulations. The “AM” packet contains 1g of strontium citrate. I took it for a few weeks, but didn’t realize that I should also have avoided calcium in food when taking the “AM” packet that contained the Strontium Citrate, so I now realize that I should have avoided eating my cereal and almond milk for breakfast, as it contained calcium. My question is, are there any negative side effects of taking the strontium citrate and calcium around the same time? I am asking because I am getting small, itchy red bumps on my skin as well as my ski feeling kind of sun burned and wondering if it could be related to the strontium citrate. Your thoughts would be much appreciated.

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Jannine,

      I have replied to your similar comment above.

      – Lara

  2. Jannine
    Jannine

    Thank you so much for responding, Lara and for responding so quickly. I apologize for posting my message twice. Initially, it did not appear that my first message went through.

    I have tried to identify any new substances in my environment and haven’t been able to identify a single one. I am very conscientious of my diet and eat very, very few processed foods. That said, your suggestion is a good one and I will keep a diary for a couple of weeks and see if something turns up.

    Thank you again for your response. It really helped put my mind at ease.

  3. Anne Walch
    Anne Walch

    Hello Lara,

    I was wondering if you had seen this article from Univ of Toronto, re lyme (borrelia burgdorferi) causing bone loss? https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-researchers-find-ancient-iceman-s-infection-helps-lyme-disease-bone-loss-discovery

    “The bacteria were not only detectable in the bones of mice, they were seen to cause significant bone loss in the longer bones, mere weeks after infection.

    In fact, the bone loss developed at a rapid rate, taking just four weeks to advance to osteopenia, a forerunner to the more severe form of bone loss disease, osteoporosis. The study found that the amount of bone loss directly correlated to the bacterial load found in the bones. The more bacteria present, the greater the rate of bone loss.”

    This is relevant to me (lyme and severe osteoporosis) and with a pandemic of lyme (say the clinician’s in the trenches treating lyme), this is probably relevant to a lot of your readers.

    Thanks for all you do,

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Anne,
      Thanks for sharing this research! That a chronic infection might promote bone loss makes a lot of sense. As you know, bacteria, both by their very presence and also in reaction to the byproducts of their own metabolism, provoke an inflammatory response by the body’s immune system. Inflammation, when chronic, promotes destruction of tissue in the joints (thus the osteoarthritis already noted) and activates osteoclasts excessively, increasing the rate of bone turnover. Since osteoblasts’ rebuilding of bone takes much longer than osteoclasts’ removal of bone, the end result is loss of bone mass. The immune system may react more strongly to some bacteria, such as those that cause lyme disease (borrelia burgdorferi), than others.
      If you carry a source of chronic infection, what can you do to lessen the effects on your joints and bones? You want to identify and eliminate as fully as possible ALL other sources of inflammation in your diet, environment and lifestyle. One very important factor to consider is vitamin A. Vitamin A is the key nutrient required for immune tolerance (vitamin A is involved in causing the immune system to produce regulatory T cells of the IL-10 strain, which help tune down and resolve inflammation), and many of us are not getting adequate vitamin A, which also works in partnership with vitamin D and should be consumed in comparable amounts for the optimal benefits derived from both nutrients. The only really good food source of vitamin A is liver, which few of us consume regularly any more (and if you do eat it, PLEASE be sure to only consume organic liver!) Until about 8 years ago, it was assumed that everyone could convert beta-carotene to vitamin A, but we now know that, in fact, the vast majority of us are not able to make this conversion because our genetic inheritance includes slow or completely ineffective versions of the key enzymes responsible for this job. Back in 2009, I wrote several medical journal articles about all this, which are still posted free access on the Longevity Medicine Review website. Here is a link to one of these articles:http://www.lmreview.com/articles/view/vitamin-a-tolerance-extends-longevity/
      I suggest you ask your doctor to run a test to have your vitamin A levels checked, and if they are not well within the normal range, that you consider supplementing with an amount of vitamin A comparable to the amount of vitamin D3 you consume. The UL for vitamin A is 70,000 IU per week or 10,000 IU per day. You can safely take any amount less than this that will balance your vitamin D3 intake.
      Another action you can take that can dramatically lower your inflammation and help protect your joints and bones is to take 2 tablespoons daily of Triple Power. I’ve written a number of articles on the necessity of having adequate supplies of EPA/DHA to protect the health of our bones, which I believe you can access on AlgaeCal’s website. Triple Power also delivers 2 highly effective natural anti-inflammatory compounds, curcumin and astaxanthin. The combination of all 3 is synergistic.
      Personally, I rely upon both vitamin A, which I take in an amount equivalent to the vitamin D3 I need to take, and 2 tablespoons of Triple Power each day, to keep my inflammation down and to protect not just my bones but my overall health. I love to exercise, have been addicted to barre classes for the last year and a half, and push my body quite hard, taking one class every day and two back-to-back classes on the weekends. I find if I am good about taking my vitamin A and Triple Power, I am rarely sore the next day. When I don’t remember, I pay for it!
      I very much hope this information will be of help. It’s impossible to avoid all the things in life that provoke inflammation, but there is much we can do to combat it and stay well! Lara

      1. Kim
        Kim

        Will taking AlgaeCal help with bone loss in jaw due to tooth loss and dentures?

        1. Megan AlgaeCal
          Megan AlgaeCal

          Hi Kim!

          AlgaeCal is clinically supported to improve bone density. While a bone density scan will typically measure critical fracture sites such as the spine and hip, you can be assured that benefits are being seen elsewhere in the skeletal system. For more information, feel free to give our Bone Health Consultants a call at 1-800-820-0184 🙂

          -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  4. Anne
    Anne

    Hello Lara,

    You are a big advocate of strontium citrate. What do you make of this 2012 study linking strontium to increased incidence of breast cancer? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22172139

    thank you!

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Anne,

      Thanks for sending me a link to this study.
      I am just now going back over all the research on strontium and will be posting a full article on all this in the very near future. But, meantime, here are my thoughts in reply to your comment.

      Yes, I do think strontium citrate may be of significant help to postmenopausal women with low bone density. Strontium both lowers osteoclast production and activity and increases osteoblast production and activity. Supplemental strontium — as part of a bone-building program that includes optimal amounts of calcium, magnesium, boron, trace minerals, vitamin D3 and vitamin K2 – can help hasten the rebuilding of healthy bones. From recent papers that I’ve read, which have shown these beneficial effects of strontium at half the dose typically recommended, I think a dose of 340 mg per day rather than the full 680 mg dose that has been standard may be all that is needed.

      In regards to the study you ask about, published in Environmental Research in 2012, that suggested strontium might increase risk of breast cancer, thank you for bringing it to my attention! I pulled and read the full paper. What they found was that an increased risk of HER2/Neu+ breast cancer was seen only in premenopausal women with the highest levels of strontium in their urine.

      The researchers hypothesized that strontium — like calcium — may activate a calcium-sensing receptor on breast cells that increases the expression of estrogen receptors, and thus have an “estrogen-like” effect. Postmenopausal women, who are no longer producing adequate estrogen, will benefit from such an estrogen-like effect, but increased ER activity in young women, who are already producing plenty of estrogen, could result in over-expression of an oncogene (cancer-promoting gene) called ERBB2.

      ERBB2 encodes a protein called HER2 (from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) or you may see it referred to as “HER2/neu.” HER2 is a member of a family of human epidermal growth factor receptors (the HER/EGFR/ERBB family). Signaling through this family of receptors promotes cell proliferation and opposes apoptosis (cell suicide), so too much signaling can increase risk of uncontrolled cell growth, i.e., breast cancer.

      Over-expression of the ERBB2 gene (also referred to as “amplification”), occurs in approximately 15-30% of breast cancers and has been shown to play a role in the development and progression of certain types (the ER+ or HER2/Neu+) breast cancers. In recent years, HER2 has become an important biomarker and target of therapy for approximately 30% of breast cancer patients.

      So, what’s the take-away from this paper by Chen LJ et al.? I’ll quote them: “…strontium may interact with estrogens to promote carcinogenesis among young [premenopausal] women, because young women have more estrogens and estrogen receptors.”

      Chen LJ, Tang LY, He JR, et al. Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Guangzhou, China. Environ Res. 2012 Jan;112:212-7. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2011.11.005. Epub 2011 Dec 15. PMID: 22172139

      After reading a number of the papers Chen LJ et al. cited in the development of their hypothesis, I looked to see if any further research had been published since 2012 to confirm their theory. I could find nothing about strontium possibly increasing risk of breast or any other form of cancer, only papers discussing the use of a radioactive isotope of strontium called Strontium-89, which is being used to effectively treat bone metastases in cancer patients with breast and other cancers. Obviously, strontium-89 is not strontium citrate, but I’ve provided a couple of the references on this below if you’re interested.

      Zenda S, Nakagami Y, Toshima M, et al. Strontium-89 (Sr-89) chloride in the treatment of various cancer patients with multiple bone metastases. Int J Clin Oncol. 2014 Aug;19(4):739-43. doi: 10.1007/s10147-013-0597-7. Epub 2013 Jul 24. PMID: 23877652
      Yamaguchi Y, Uejima C, Tada Y, et al. [Breast Cancer Patient with Bone Metastases Who Was Able to Return Home without Using Opioids after Administration of Strontium-89 Chloride]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 2016 Sep;43(9):1105-7. [Article in Japanese] PMID: 27628553

      The bottom line here: To err on the side of safety, I would not recommend the use of strontium citrate in young, premenopausal women. Postmenopausal women with low bone density are likely to benefit from strontium citrate.

      1. Betsy
        Betsy

        Hello –
        I just came across this thread and have a question. I’m on an estrogen-blocker after having had breast cancer three years ago. I already had osteoporosis before I started on the drug and this drug is known to cause bone loss so I’m happy to have found algae cal plus, but do you have thoughts about whether the strontium is necessary or safe under these circumstances?

        Thanks so much!

        1. Megan AlgaeCal
          Megan AlgaeCal

          Hi Betsy, thank you for reaching out!

          If you are taking an aromatase inhibitor, you can safely take Strontium Boost alongside this type of medication. Not only are there no contraindications between the aromatase inhibitors and any of the minerals or vitamins in AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost or the omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin and astaxanthin in Triple Power, but each of these nutritional supplements will help lessen the bone loss!

          Hope this helps! If you have any other questions or need clarification, please feel free to email [email protected] or call our Bone Health Consultants at 1-800-820-0184!

          – Megan @ AlgaeCal

  5. hotel frankfurt-Oder
    hotel frankfurt-Oder

    Howdy! I just want to give an enormous thumbs up for the great info you’ve here on this post. I shall be coming back to your blog soon.

  6. Lynn Heney
    Lynn Heney

    I just started taking AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Citrate.
    I take a PPI for stomach ulcers which is time release and works for 24 hours.
    Will this affect the absorption of the bone building products?

  7. Lynn Heney
    Lynn Heney

    I just started taking AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Citrate.
    I take a PPI for stomach issues.
    Will this affect the absorption of the AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Citrate.

    1. Monica
      Monica

      Hi Lynn,
      If you are taking AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost, please take your PPI 4 hours apart so it won’t affect absorption.
      – Monica

  8. GARRETT CLINGWALL
    GARRETT CLINGWALL

    I can take strontium citrate with juice or tea?

    1. Monica
      Monica

      Hi Garett,

      As long as the juice or tea does not contain calcium. Some juices will add calcium carbonate to it so check the label, or if you drink tea, avoid any added milks or creams.

      – Monica

  9. pam dassel
    pam dassel

    I too have the same concern about the replacement of bone with strontium vrs calcium. this does not seem like it honors the natural biological process of building bone structure.
    I understand that strontium is an element with a higher weight on the periodic table and therefore occupies more space or creates a “denser” appearing bone structure on a DEXA. I want to build bone but am apprehensive about replacing calcium with strontium. I would appreciate your best scientific information Laura. I have read your book,Your Bones and not really found a specific answer to this question . thank you
    pam

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Pam,

      I’ve recently written an update of my earlier article on strontium that should be posted on AlgaeCal very shortly. The new article covers all the latest research and will answer your questions and concerns in (probably far more) detail than you want to wade through!

      So, I’m writing you directly with a brief summary of some of the relevant information provided in my update on strontium, which I hope will allay your concerns.

      Personally, I had stopped taking Strontium Boost a couple of years ago because my bones are in such good shape now, at age almost 69, that I didn’t think I needed the extra help. But, after reading all the current research (more than 70 papers) on strontium, I started taking it again at a half dose to ensure my bones remain healthy. My husband, Dr. Joe Pizzorno, is approaching age 70 and still playing basketball with men half his age; I had him read my review and he has started taking strontium at a half dose as well to protect his knees as I also showed him some good studies showing strontium helps maintain healthy cartilage in the joints.

      Okay, here’s a quick overview of some of the information in my updated strontium article that is relevant to your concerns:

      Strontium’s beneficial effects are NOT due to its replacing calcium in your bones. Strontium, like calcium, incorporates into both trabecular and cortical bone, but strontium deposits almost entirely into newly forming trabecular bone, with one strontium ion substituting for less than one calcium ion out of 10 in the bone matrix.

      When you take strontium, it will take the place of an extremely small number of calcium ions, but this tiny amount of strontium will have MANY very positive effects on your bones’ ability to not just rebuild, but to become more resilient and resistant to fracture.

      Again, I want to underscore that strontium’s beneficial effects on our bones NOT due to its taking the place of calcium. They are the result of strontium’s very positive bone-building effects on virtually all the key molecules involved in bone remodeling, including the following:

        RANKL &OPG: RANKL binding to RANK stimulates osteoclast production and activity; strontium inhibits RANKL binding. OPG is a decoy for RANKL and binds to RANK, decreasing osteoclast production; strontium increases OPG production.
        Wnt signaling: Wnt signaling is involved in osteoblast production & activity; strontium triggers Wnt signaling.
        Osteoblasts: Strontium increases the rate at which these bone-building cells are produced and increases their lifespan
        Osteoid: Osteoblasts secrete osteoid, the unmineralized portion of the bone matrix, as the first step in their bone building process. Strontium increases osteoblasts’ production of osteoid.
        Osteoclasts: Strontium inhibits the production of these bone-resorbing cells and the rate at which they remove old bone
        Mesenchymal stem cells: Exposure to strontium promotes these precursor cells’ development into osteoblasts rather than into adipocytes (fat cells)
        Osteocalcin: Osteocalcin is the vitamin K-dependent protein that, when activated by K2, delivers calcium into bone. Strontium increases the production of osteocalcin
        Strength/stability of apatite crystals – Apatite, which is composed primarily of calcium + phosphate, is the basic mineral component used in our bones and teeth. The apatite crystals that contain strontium ions are more stable, have more regular shapes and are more resistant to stress.

      I hope this information helps – it is ALL fully referenced by articles in the PubMed listed journals – all the references will appear in the article with links to the papers once published.

      Be well!
      Lara

  10. LINDA WELLS
    LINDA WELLS

    I have some older bottles(2 years) of strontium citrate—3 caps = 750mgs. First, does strontium expire? Secondly is 750 mgs an unadvisable dose. I do have mild osteoporosis.. I do take adequate amounts of calcium, magnesium and vitamin d3. Thanks

  11. Lara Pizzorno
    Lara Pizzorno

    Hi Linda,
    I’m very glad you wrote in as I am concerned about the amount of strontium you are taking.
    The dosage recommended for Strontium Boost is 2 capsules daily, which supplies a total of 680 mg of strontium. Since your supplement is giving you 750 mg of strontium in 3 capsules, it looks like you are taking a different strontium citrate supplement.
    First of all, 750 mg/d is an excessively high dose — higher than that used in all the research I’ve seen on strontium. Regardless of whether the form used was natural strontium citrate or the drug strontium ranelate, the maximum dose used has been 680 mg/d. I do not recommend taking 750 mg/d.
    If you are going to use up your current supplement, be sure you are getting twice as much calcium as strontium from your food and the supplements you are taking. This would be 1,500 mg of calcium per day, which is greater than the 1,200 mg RDI for calcium for postmenopausal women.
    If you are going to be taking 1,500 mg of calcium daily (which I also do not recommend), then you need to balance that by ensuring your diet and supplements are providing you with half that amount of magnesium, or 750 mg of magnesium daily.
    The expiration date for your supplement should be listed on the bottle. You’ll find the expiration date for Strontium Boost clearly printed on the bottom of each bottle. A bottle of Strontium Boost will be good for 2.5 years. The batch of Strontium Boost I ordered and received this June (June 2017) for myself and my husband has an expiration date of 1/2020.

    If you are taking AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost, these supplements will automatically be providing you with optimal, balanced doses of calcium, magnesium and strontium — one of many reasons I rely upon these supplements for myself. If you are using something else, please do check that your diet and supplements combined are not giving you more than 1,200 mg of calcium, 600 mg of magnesium and 680 mg of strontium citrate each day.
    In Your Bones, 2nd edition, I have provided tables for calcium and magnesium listing commonly eaten food sources and the amount of each mineral provided in a typical serving, hoping to make it easy for you to figure this out. And, of course, you can run a search for food sources of calcium and magnesium on the internet to get this information. Just check that the websites listing this information have derived it from the USDA National Nutrient database.
    Be well,
    Lara

  12. Grace du Prie
    Grace du Prie

    I have just started with Strontium Citrate (also the 750mg dose). I take the Nutralife Calcium with VitD3 and VitK. I know now to separate these two. But…I also take Magnesium and usually 2 caps before going to sleep. Can I take Strontium and Magnesium at the same time? The Magnesium has these contents: Nutra-Life Magnesium Complete Ingredients:
    Each capsule provides:
    Magnesium (as Oxide) 197mg
    Magnesium (as Orotate) 8mg
    Magnesium (as Phosphate) 21mg
    Magnesium (as Amino Acid Chelate) 75mg
    Total Magnesium 300mg

    1. Monica
      Monica

      Hi Grace,

      Yes, you can take Strontium and Magnesium at the same time.

      – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  13. yanntreguier
    yanntreguier

    Hello Lara, would you be so kind to post links to the most recent independent scientific studies and tests done on Strontium Citrate? You recently stated the following: “Strontium, like calcium, incorporates into both trabecular and cortical bone, but strontium deposits almost entirely into newly forming trabecular bone, with one strontium ion substituting for less than one calcium ion out of 10 in the bone matrix.” I would be really interested to know 1) the exact amount that ends up as cortical bone and its incidence in making it weaker 2) to view the studies highlighting the assimilation of Strontium as trabecular bone.

    Thank you!

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hello yanntreguier,

      Following is my reply to your questions asking for 1) the exact amount of strontium that ends up as cortical bone and its incidence in making it weaker 2) to view the studies highlighting the assimilation of Strontium as trabecular bone.

      Re #1, the specific data you requested does not exist. The research – both animal and human — does not specify the precise amount of strontium that deposits in cortical bone, but clearly show that the majority of the strontium incorporated goes into trabecular bone. Furthermore, the strontium that does deposit in cortical bone does NOT render it weaker, but more stable and resistant to fracture – as explained in this paper, which I mention again below. Riedel C, Zimmermann EA, Zustin J, et al. The incorporation of fluoride and strontium in hydroxyapatite affects the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of human cortical bone. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2017 Feb;105(2):433-442. doi: 10.1002/jbm.a.35917. Epub 2016 Oct 21. PMID: 27684387

      Re #2, following are the citations of a few of these papers (all are available on PubMed) with my italics added for emphasis and my comments on the relevant text:
      Pors Nielsen S. The biological role of strontium. Bone. 2004 Sep;35(3):583-8. PMID: 15336592 DOI: 10.1016/j.bone.2004.04.026.
      Pors Nielsen summarizes the results of numerous studies in this review article. Here’s what he reports from the following 2 papers he discusses that is relevant to your question:
      1) Boivin G, Deloffre P, Perrat B, et al. Strontium distribution and interactions with bone mineral in monkey iliac bone after strontium salt (S12911) administration. J Bone Miner Res 1996;11:1302– 11.
      2) Delannoy P, Bazot D, Marie PJ. Long-term treatment with strontium ranelate increases vertebral bone mass without deleterious effect in mice. Metabolism 2002;51:906– 11.

      “Strontium was dose-dependently incorporated into bone mineral of both trabecular and compact bone, mainly into new bone, and mainly into trabecular bone…No changes in the crystal lattice, in crystallinity, or crystal structure were observed. Less than one Ca ion out of 10 was substituted for by one Sr ion in each crystal
      Long-term studies in rats confirmed pronounced dose-related increments in trabecular bone volume, mineralised bone volume, osteoblastic surface, and a reduction in osteoclast number, but osteoid thickness was not affected.”

      Dahl SG, Allain P, Marie PJ, et al. Incorporation and distribution of strontium in bone. Bone. 2001 Apr;28(4):446-53. PMID: 11336927 again discusses that strontium primarily deposits in newly forming trabecular bone. Here’s a quote from this paper summarizing the results of several studies discussing this:
      “Sr21 is taken up into bone by two different mechanisms: (1) an initial rapid mode, depending on osteoblastic activity, which is eventually saturated, and whereby Sr21 is taken up by ionic exchange with bone Ca21, binding of Sr21 to preosteoid proteins, or combinations of these; and (2) a second slower mechanism involving the incorporation of Sr21 into the crystal lattice of the bone mineral. The concept of two different phases involved in the uptake of strontium into bone has since been generally accepted — that is, a relatively rapid uptake into new bone and long-term exchange processes in old bone.”

      (Lara comment —the new bone referred to here is trabecular bone; a much slower second phase of uptake occurs in cortical bone.)

      “X-ray crystallographic experiments have demonstrated that incorporation of strontium into the bone of cynomolgus monkeys treated with oral strontium ranelate for 13 weeks took place mainly by ionic exchange at crystal surfaces [Lara — i.e., trabecular bone], and to a minor extent by heteroionic substitution (with a maximum of one calcium atom out of ten being substituted) into the crystal lattice [Lara—i.e., cortical as well as trabecular bone]. The differences in strontium incorporation into bones were further analyzed at a microscopic level using the X-ray microanalysis technique, and the influence of the presence of strontium on the size of the crystal was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman microspectrometric techniques. These techniques were applied on bone mineral samples obtained from the iliac crest of male cynomolgus monkeys treated for 13 weeks with oral doses of strontium ranelate. The doses ranged from 100 to 750 mg/kg per day of strontium ranelate, corresponding to 34–255 mg/kg per day of Sr21. The X-ray microanalysis method provided a semiquantitative evaluation of the amount of strontium taken up by the bone mineral substance, and its localization. Combined with X-ray diffraction and secondary Raman spectroscopic images, it was demonstrated that strontium was dose-dependently taken up by the bone mineral and heterogeneously distributed in compact and cancellous bone, with a higher amount in newly formed bone tissue than in old bone tissue. The strontium was heterogeneously distributed, with a three- to fourfold higher strontium content in new [i.e., trabecular] than in old compact [i.e. cortical] bone, and approximately 2.5-fold higher strontium content in new than in old cancellous [so strontium uptake is greater in new vs older trabecular bone] bone. At all the applied doses, incorporation of strontium produced no significant change in the crystal lattice parameters, even if the ionic radius of Sr21 (1.13 Å) is slightly larger than that of Ca21 (0.99 Å) (Table 1). Neither were there changes of the cohesion properties of the mineral crystals, which exhibited properties of “young” bone (i.e., low intracrystal distances). Even at the highest dose of 255 mg Sr21/kg per day, the apatite crystals in the treated animals were intermediates between a “physiologic” calcium hydroxyapatite and an apatite where one calcium atom out of ten was substituted by a strontium atom. In vitro chemical experiments have also shown that Ca21 may be exchanged by Sr21 in synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite.”

      Lara: The incorporation of strontium into bone after oral strontium treatment depends upon the skeletal site — more specifically, the amount of trabecular vs cortical bone in the skeletal site. Here’s a quote on this from the above cited Dahl et al., paper:

      “The main biological determinant of bone mineralization is the rate of turnover… The skeletal repartition of strontium is related to the relative cortical and cancellous proportions of the bone, because bone turnover is higher in cancellous than in cortical bone, and newly formed bone is more abundant in cancellous than in cortical bone. This is demonstrated in Figure 5, which shows that the strontium content was higher in cancellous bone than in cortical bone of cynomolgus monkeys, treated for 13 weeks with various strontium doses. (Lara — Sorry, I cannot copy this figure here for you – copyright on the article prevents that, but you can look at the full article via PubMed)

      The research conducted in the above papers used strontium ranelate, however, other papers show the same findings using natural forms of strontium, e.g.:
      Peng S, Liu XS, Huang S, et al. The cross-talk between osteoclasts and osteoblasts in response to strontium treatment: involvement of osteoprotegerin. Bone. 2011 Dec;49(6):1290-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2011.08.031. Epub 2011 Sep 9. PMID: 21925296:

      1. Lara Pizzorno
        Lara Pizzorno

        In animal research, female rats whose ovaries had been removed (the standard protocol used to simulate human menopause) were given strontium chloride over a 2-month period. Strontium’s effect of increasing OPG production was a key factor in the following bone-protective outcomes: greater trabecular bone volume, an increase in the number of trabecular bone cells, larger areas of the bone surface occupied by osteoid cells (osteoid is the last step before final mineralization occurs to produce fully developed new bone tissue), [all trabecular bone] an increase in bone formation rate, and fewer, smaller areas of bone in which osteoclasts were active.
        Marie PJ, Ammann P, Boivin G, et al. Mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential of strontium in bone. Calcif Tissue Int. 2001 Sep;69(3):121-9. PMID: 11683526:

        Animal studies using strontium chloride found that within 4 weeks, strontium increased the number of bone-forming sites, trabecular bone formation and bone volume in vertebrae and alveolar bone (the jawbone), and reduced the number of osteoclasts present. [again, areas richer in trabecular bone]
        Marie PJ, Ammann P, Boivin G, et al. Mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential of strontium in bone. Calcif Tissue Int. 2001 Sep;69(3):121-9. PMID: 11683526:

        Administration of strontium carbonate for 6 months in osteoporotic patients stimulated bone formation confirmed by hip bone (iliac crest) [another area richer in trabecular bone] bone biopsies. Strontium carbonate administration increased both the extent of osteoblast surface and the amount of bone matrix formed, confirming that strontium increases trabecular bone formation in humans with osteoporosis.

        Lara – so to reiterate, strontium deposits primarily in trabecular bone, the inner spongy portion of bone, where metabolism is much more active than in cortical bone, the outermost hard, older portion of our bones.

        The very small amount of strontium that incorporates into human cortical bone also has beneficial effect, however, – the strontium that deposits in cortical bone lowers its porosity, further improving bone microstructure and resistance to deformation. Riedel C, Zimmermann EA, Zustin J, et al. The incorporation of fluoride and strontium in hydroxyapatite affects the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of human cortical bone. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2017 Feb;105(2):433-442. doi: 10.1002/jbm.a.35917. Epub 2016 Oct 21. PMID: 27684387

        The most recently published human study that discusses strontium’s incorporation into trabecular versus cortical bone is Moise H, Chettle DR, Pejović-Milić A. Monitoring bone strontium intake in osteoporotic females self-supplementing with strontium citrate with a novel in-vivo X-ray fluorescence based diagnostic tool. Bone. 2014 Apr;61:48-54. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.01.002. Epub 2014 Jan 14. PMID: 24434614
        In this study, 10 female volunteers recruited as part of the Ryerson and McMaster University Strontium (Sr) in Bone Research Study had their bone strontium levels measured as they self-supplemented with strontium supplements of their choice (all used strontium citrate) over a 4-year period. Of the ten volunteers, nine had osteopenia and/or osteoporosis.

        Strontium measurements were taken at the finger and ankle, representing primarily cortical and trabecular bone, respectively. After 24 hours, the mean strontium signal rose in both the finger and ankle, and strontium levels continued to increase in both finger and ankle throughout the length of the study.

        However – and this is why I am unable to tell you exactly how much strontium is deposited in cortical and in trabecular bone in real individual people – the strontium signal varied widely between individuals such that after three years, the highest strontium signal observed was 28.15 for the finger (cortical bone) and 26.47 for the ankle in one volunteer and only 3.15 for the finger (cortical) and 4.46 for the ankle (trabecular) bone in another. These results indicate that all benefitted, although to varying degrees and also that both trabecular and cortical bone strontium levels do continue to slowly increase at both sites after 4 years of strontium citrate intake.

        Here are a few quotes (italics added by me) from this paper, again stressing that strontium deposits primarily in trabecular bone:
        “While the human skeleton is composed of approximately 80% cortical and 20% trabecular bone, it has been observed that Sr absorption is different between these two types of bone, with trabecular bone showing a higher Sr concentration than cortical bone, likely due to the fact that cortical bone has a slower turnover rate compared to trabecular bone. Similarly, the initial case study found that Sr levels were higher at trabecular bone compared to cortical bone and that ankle levels [trabecular bone] continued to increase, even after 24 months of strontium supplementation. This is in agreement with the findings available in the literature.”

        “…the frequent bone Sr measurements in all subjects show that the Sr signal is higher in the ankle (primarily trabecular bone) than in the finger (primarily cortical bone), which is in agreement with literature findings that different bone sites will show different bone Sr concentrations.”

        I hope this information is helpful for you. The key take-away here is that natural forms of strontium significantly improve our ability to build new trabecular bone and maintain healthy (older) cortical bone – a win-win for our skeletal health.

        1. yanntreguier
          yanntreguier

          Thank you Lara for that thorough response! Quick follow-up questions. In the study of the 10 women supplementing with strontium over 4 years: what was their daily intake of strontium?

          Has science and/or the medical field determined whether or not there is a level of strontium not to exceed in the human body? If there is a line not to cross and the studies prove that one’s strontium levels continuously increase when supplementing, how do you determine when to stop strontium intake?

          Thanks!
          Yann

          1. Lara Pizzorno
            Lara Pizzorno

            Hi Yann,
            You’re so welcome. Great questions!
            In the studies that involved 10 women self-supplementing with strontium (strontium citrate)as part of the Ryerson and McMaster Strontium in Bone Research Study in Canada, 9 were taking 340 mg per day, and one was taking 680 mg/d. Interestingly, the women taking 340 mg/d had comparable or better results than the woman taking 680mg/d — an outcome the researchers thought might have been due to the fact that the women taking 340 mg/d took their strontium at night (when bone remodeling is more active), while the woman taking 680 mg/d took her strontium supplement during the day. Here’s the citation for the most recent paper on this research: Moise H, Chettle DR, Pejović-Milić A. Modeling elemental strontium in human bone based on in vivo x-ray fluorescence measurements in osteoporotic females self-supplementing with strontium citrate. Physiol Meas. 2016 Mar;37(3):429-41. doi: 10.1088/0967-3334/37/3/429. Epub 2016 Feb 24. PMID: 26910208
            The key issue regarding the safety of natural forms of strontium is calcium intake, which to err on the side of safety, should be at least double that of the amount of strontium consumed. Since consumption of more than 1,500 mg per day of calcium is not recommended, consumption of no more than 750 mg/day of strontium is indicated.
            Although strontium levels in bone do continue to increase over time, the number of strontium ions incorporated into the bone matrix is so miniscule– remember one strontium ion replaces less than one calcium ion out of ten, plus as bone remodeling is continuous, these strontium ions are resorbed (just as calcium ions are during normal bone remodeling), so for all practical purposes, strontium intake can be continued throughout life.
            Once bone health is restored, a maintenance dose of 340 mg per day should be both safe and sufficient. This is the dose I now take myself as my bones have now been in perfect shape for several years — thank you, AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost! And 340 mg/d is the amount of Strontium Boost I will continue to take to maintain that condition. I hope to be taking 340 mg/d of Strontium Boost for the next ~50 years. I’m now almost 70; the maximal human lifespan is currently thought to be ~120 years – and my son, who is just graduating from medical school this May (with honors), has had not time to even think about a relationship, much less marriage and children. I’m counting on Strontium Boost (and AlgaeCal Plus) to keep my bones in good shape for my, as yet, non-existent grandchildren.
            Be well, Lara

  14. JoAnn Petrov
    JoAnn Petrov

    Hi Laura

    I just received my AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost today. Should I stop taking my Calcium supplement and my Multivitamin for Women 50+ before taking the AlgaeCal and Strontium?
    I have been diagnoised with Osteoprosis.

  15. JoAnn Petrov
    JoAnn Petrov

    Hi Lara

    I just received my AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost today. Should I stop taking my Calcium supplement and my Multivitamin for Women 50+ before taking the AlgaeCal and Strontium?
    I have been diagnoised with Osteoprosis.

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi JoAnn,
      Great! You’re on your way back to healthy bones! You will not need your former calcium supplement. AlgaeCal Plus provides 720 mg of calcium per day (4 capsules — 2 AM and 2 PM) and your diet should be giving you the remaining 380 mg of calcium you need to reach a daily intake of 1,200 mg/day. If you have a copy of Your Bones, please check the section on calcium where I have provided a table showing the best food sources of calcium (p. 207 in the book) along with how much calcium is present in a typical serving of each food. Keep a diet diary for 4-5 days and you should be able to easily see how much calcium your diet is providing for you. Optimal intake is 1,2– – 1,500 mg per day for someone with osteoporosis. I do not know what your multivitamin contains. You can send AlgaeCal a list of what it contains or send me a link to this supplement, so I can take a look for you, but it’s unlikely that it contains much calcium or amounts of any other nutrient that would be potentially problematic.

      1. Cinzia
        Cinzia

        Hello Laura,

        I take a Progessive MultiVitamin for women over 50 three times a day as suggested. That means I am getting 250 mg of calcium. I think that’s too much along with the 720 from AlgaeCal but don’t wanr to miss out on the other vitamins & minerals if I stop taking the multivitamin. Do you take a multivitamin as well? Thank you so much for your feedback. https://www.progressivenutritional.com/products/multivitamin-for-women-50

        1. Lara Pizzorno
          Lara Pizzorno

          Hello Cinzia,
          You should be consuming from 1,200 -1,500 mg of calcium daily. Your multiple (250 mg) plus AlgaeCal (720 mg) delivers 970 mg. Your diet should be providing at least 450-600 mg. If you have a copy of Your Bones, 2nd edition, you can use the Foods Rich in Calcium table in the book to quickly get a good estimate of the amount of calcium your foods are providing for you.
          And remember, your intake of calcium should be balanced by an intake of about half as much magnesium, so 600-750 mg of magnesium daily. AlgaeCal Plus provides this balance, giving you 350 mg of magnesium, and it looks like your multiple also maintains this balance. Check your diet to see how much magnesium it provides, again, you can use the Foods Rich in Magnesium table to do so quickly if you have Your Bones. If not you can find this information on the internet, but be sure you check to see how much is being said to be a “serving”. Often what is listed as a serving is less than we typically consume or far more, so do double check.

  16. Connie Chiasson-Douglass
    Connie Chiasson-Douglass

    I ordered the AlgeaCal plus and the Strontium – can I just take the calcium without the other and still see results with diet and exercise (elliptical 3 xs a week , kettlebell 3 xs a week and yoga 2 x’s per week? or is the Strontium a must – I am 56 years old – left hip -2.45. Just prefer not to take anything that may have side effects.

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Connie,
      I hope my full review of strontium will put to rest any concerns you might have regarding the potential for any adverse effects from the natural form of strontium, strontium citrate, which is what is present in Strontium Boost. The only form of strontium for which ADRs have ever been reported is the unnatural, drug form, strontium ranelate, which has never been approved for use in the U.S. and whose use is now severely restricted in Europe.
      Yes, you will benefit from just AlgaeCal Plus (which will provide you with much more than calcium! Vitamin D3, K2 (MK-7), magnesium, boron, vitamin C — all are essential for bone health). However, because you have significant bone loss (-2.45 in your left hip), you need to avail yourself of all natural, safe means of restoring the health of your bones. Please review the dozens of ways I share from the current research in my review of strontium via which strontium promotes healthful bone formation — for all these reasons, I urge you to include Strontium Boost as part of your protocol.
      Since the most current research indicates that half the typical dose of strontium (i.e., one capsule of Strontium Boost daily rather than two) is helpful, start out taking just one capsule daily — at night please, at least 4 hours after you take your PM dose of AlgaeCal Plus — since night time consumption of strontium citrate has been found most effective. This is what I do for myself. Although my bones have now been in excellent shape for several years (I was still osteopenic when I began taking AlgaeCal Plus & Strontium Boost, which fully restored the health of my bones after just 6 months), I continue to take Strontium Boost as well as AlgaeCal Plus to ensure my bones remain strong and healthy. And I make sure my husband, who does not have bone density problems, but does have knee joint problems, takes both (he also takes just one capsule of Strontium Boost at night), so he can continue to play basketball. When I started him on this protocol about a year ago now, he was limping, wearing a knee brace, and fearing his bball playing days were over. Now, he’s outplaying men half his age (he just turned 70), no brace, no limp. NO adverse side effects. (And he is MUCH happier! and recommending this protocol to other men). Please give Strontium Boost a try.

  17. Claire Dant
    Claire Dant

    Just started taking AlgaeCal and Strontium Boost (separately as instructed). Have been experiencing quite a bit of nausea. Could this be a related side effect?

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hello Claire,

      Sorry to hear you’re experiencing nausea – not fun! But, it might be a positive indication that you are producing a healthy amount of stomach acid, which would enable you to quickly dissolve your supplements for absorption. If this happens on an empty stomach with no food present to disperse the highly concentrated vitamins and minerals, the result can be nausea.

      So, my first question for you is, “Are you taking your AlgaeCal Plus & Strontium Boost on an empty stomach?”
      Any vitamins taken on an empty stomach are likely to cause nausea. Supplements should always be taken with food, both to provide a buffer if your stomach acid production is good and to trigger sufficient stomach acid production if your ability to produce stomach acid has begun to decline.

      You don’t have to be eating a full meal; a small snack will be sufficient. However, do remember to take your Strontium Boost with a snack that does not contain calcium – an apple, a couple of whole grain (preferably gluten-free) crackers, a handful of nuts (peanuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds are fine; almonds, walnuts, cashews, sesame seeds contain calcium, so not your best option a snack when taking Strontium Boost).

      Next, I’m wondering:
      “What is your digestion like, normally? Any issues?”
      “Has anything else – diet or medications or an infection, like the flu — changed recently?” (Having the flu can depress your stomach’s ability to secrete stomach acid for a bit, so can antibiotics if you’ve been told to take them for any reason.)
      “Are you taking any prescription or over-the-counter drugs?” (Many impair digestion, not just the acid blockers.)
      “How old are you?” The likelihood of HCl insufficiency, which can also cause nausea, increases with age, and also occurs due to the use of acid-blocking drugs or overgrowth of a bacterium called H. pylori, which is surprisingly common.

      If you still experience nausea when taking your supplements with food, try supplementing with HCl with betaine (Here’s a link to the discussion of this in our recent ACV post for directions on how to do this: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/video-lara-pizzorno-apple-cider-vinegar-calcium-absorption/).
      If this does not help, you should see your doctor to rule out other causes of gastritis (stomach inflammation), such as H. pylori infection or problems with your gallbladder or pancreas — both of which are involved in digestion (the gallbladder secretes bile, pancreas produces pancreatic enzymes), so their dysfunction can cause nausea.

  18. sharon
    sharon

    If strontium is high 1.03 rising from .043 8 months earlier and hair loss what would you suggest, check the kidney function??

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hello Sharon,

      It would be very helpful if you could send me the lab data specifics here – 1.03 what? What is the measurement being used here? This level may be excellent and may simply be indicating you are effectively absorbing strontium. Baseline levels of strontium will always be low – unless you live in Turkey in the one region where strontium levels in the soil are extraordinarily high.

      If your current level actually is too high, then cut your dosage in half. If you are taking 680 mg/d, cut this back to 340 mg/d; the latest research indicates you will still receive significant benefit from this lower dosage.

      Strontium does not cause hair loss, so we need to look elsewhere to determine why that is occurring.

      The most likely cause is thyroid dysfunction. Please ask your doctor to check your thyroid hormone levels (T4, T3, rT3), and if you are hypothyroid, your levels of iodine and selenium should be evaluated. You need both trace minerals to produce and utilize thyroid hormones. Providing them, if you are currently deficient –and many people are — may restore healthful thyroid function. If not, thyroid hormone replacement is commonly done, but just remember to have your doctor check your thyroid hormone levels after the first 6 months and then at least annually to ensure the dosage you are being given is correct for you. Too high a dosage promotes bone loss.

      Your doctor will be aware of the connection between hypothyroidism and hair loss, but may not be aware that hyperprolactinemia is another potential cause, so I’m pasting in a recent citation on this here: Ziai M, Cifuentes L, Grosber M, et al. Diffuse hair loss associated with hyperprolactinaemia: report of three cases. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015 Mar;29(3):607-8. doi: 10.1111/jdv.12407. Epub 2014 Feb 25. PMID: 24612329

      Many commonly prescribed drugs cause hyperprolactinemia. Please take a look at my post titled Commonly Prescribed Drugs Cause Bone Loss and check any drugs you regularly take to see if they have this adverse side effect (https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/prescription-drugs-that-cause-osteoporosis/). If so, discuss alternatives with your physician.

      I very much hope this information will be helpful for you,

      Lara

  19. Kay
    Kay

    Hi Lara,
    I recently did a test for toxicity from QuickSilver. The only red flag I received was for Strontium. My number was 98. The range that it should be was given as less than 61. Any ideas as to why I could be high here? I looked up foods that might bring this about and the only one on the list that could possible be a culprit was spinach. I know you focus on strontium supplementation but should I be concerned if I have too much strontium? I follow the Bresdan protocol, eat a whole foods Keto diet, am gluten,dairy,soy and sugar free, walk 3 miles daily, and eat organic 90% of the time. I do have Hashimoto’s and have been on a compounded T3 for over 20 years. I also take WP which is similar to Armour. I am concerned when I read that too much strontium can cause softening of the bones. Osteoporosis does run in my family with both my grandmother and my mom struggling with this. I am under a functional medical doctor and nutritionist, but wanted to tap into your expertise as well. I know that I am my own best advocate when it comes to my health and appreciate your willingness to help those of us who are trying to educate ourselves.

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Kay,
      Of course, happy to do what I can to be of help, and yes, each of us is our own best advocate, although you are definitely in good hands if you are working with a fully IFM certified functional medicine physician and nutritionist. I’m not familiar with Quick Silver; what labs do they run? Also is the Bresdan protocol Dale’s recommendations for Alzheimer’s disease prevention? Are you ApoE4? Need more info on YOU and and why you are restricting soy and dairy as well as gluten. What issues have you had that have lead you to these choices? How old are you? Are you perimenopausal? postmenopausal? How is your digestion? How are your kidneys? Are you currently taking supplemental strontium? If so, what product and at what dosage?

  20. Lorraine
    Lorraine

    I am Interested in taking this strontium first thing in the morning so I don’t have to think about what I’m eating before bed. I have a smoothie for breakfast that contains a bunch of kale. If I have strontium two hours before the kale will that be sufficient? alternatively, is there a vegetable that I could substitute the kale for to put in my smoothie that is low in calcium so I could take with the strontium? I like to get vegetables in as much as possible.

    1. Jenna AlgaeCal
      Jenna AlgaeCal

      Hi Lorraine,

      You can definitely take your strontium first thing in the morning! A 4 hour separation is ideal, however as long as there is at least a 2 hour separation between strontium and calcium you can take it at any time of the day – so taking your breakfast smoothie 2 hours later would be sufficient. 🙂

      – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  21. Lorraine
    Lorraine

    Also, Is it OK to take the strontium with a banana?

    1. Jenna AlgaeCal
      Jenna AlgaeCal

      Yes, you can take strontium with a banana because they are quite low in calcium! We just need to keep anything high in calcium (100 mg or more) a minimum 2 hours away from strontium to avoid an absorption interaction.

      – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

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  23. Vickie Harris
    Vickie Harris

    I have been speaking to a clinical and technical instructor for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry on an osteoporosis support group who says, about the study “The effect of bone strontium on BMD is different for different manufacturers’ DXA systems”, that in order to use the correction factors developed in this study still requires knowing how much calcium was replaced by strontium. That currently is only possible after removing the bone, ashing it and chemically analyzing the minerals. If this is the case, how is it possible to get a proper BMD reading from your DXA scan if you’ve been taking strontium? Is it the case that you’ve just got to estimate it? If that’s so, how could you possibly come up with an accurate number? I will be having my next DXA scan in a month, after two years on AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost, and I want to be able to at least have a fairly accurate knowledge of what my BMD is.

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Vickie,

      Yes, your DXA BMD score will be impacted by strontium. Strontium is larger than calcium, and as I’ve explained in my post here on AlgaeCal, available data indicate that approximately 50% of the increase seen in BMD over 3 years of treatment with strontium is due to strontium’s larger size – which also means that 50% of the increase seen in BMD is due to improved bone mineral accumulation.

      You should also know that your BMD score will be impacted if you have your DXA run on a different machine from the one used for your prior DXA.
      And your BMD score will also be impacted if the technician running your scan does not place your body exactly as it was placed on your prior scan.

      In other words, your DXA BMD score is, in fact, an estimate – it’s a very good estimate, but it is not 100% an “accurate” number in the way you are using this adjective.
      The good news here is that you do not need to be stressed out about this! Your DXA will definitely give you the most important information you need to have, which is, “Has my BMD improved?”

      A few other things to keep in mind regarding strontium and calcium:
      Both minerals share a common carrier system in the intestinal wall, which will always choose to transport calcium rather than strontium from our digestive tract into our bloodstream. Since you are taking AlgaeCal Plus and thus getting at least twice as much calcium as strontium, you are never going to absorb more strontium than calcium. In your bones as well as in your digestive tract, strontium and calcium compete for absorption, and calcium wins every time.

      Strontium, like calcium, incorporates into both trabecular and cortical bone, but strontium deposits almost entirely into new trabecular bone, with one strontium ion substituting for less than one calcium ion out of 10. In other words, for every 10 calcium ions your bones absorb, they will absorb less than 1 strontium ion. Because strontium is almost twice as large as calcium, even this tiny number of strontium-for-calcium ions exchanged in your bones can impact DXA readings. But this very tiny amount of strontium nonetheless has major beneficial impacts on your bones’ health, strength and flexibility.

      I really want to underscore here the fact that the strontium’s beneficial effects on our bones are NOT due to its replacing calcium in our bones!
      They are the result of strontium’s bone-building effects on a very wide range of key molecules involved in healthy bone remodeling. Strontium increases your bones’ ability to absorb calcium, regulates / helps balance the activity of RANKL and OPG, activates Wnt signaling, increases osteoblast production and activity and lifespan, improves osteoblasts’ mineralization of bone, inhibits osteoclast formation and activity, improves bones mechanical resistance to fracture … and more.

      DXA only checks BMD, which is a measure of quantity. DXA does not check for quality – that’s what TBS analyzes – and quality is critical for your bones’ ability to resist fracturing, which is the real goal here, right? Here’s a link to my talk on TBS: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/how-to-analyze-your-dexa-results-for-bone-quality/ The really good news is that your DXA images can be used to calculate your TBS, so please request that this be done for you when you go in for your next DXA.

      I hope this helps set your mind at ease and that you will be delighted with you upcoming DXA/TBS results.

      Be WELL!
      Lara

  24. Vickie Harris
    Vickie Harris

    Thank you for the information about the DXA scan and the TBS. I will be having the scan done at my rheumatologist’s office, the same place I had it done before and I will be sure to ask for the TBS.

  25. Jeanette Svensk Li
    Jeanette Svensk Li

    Hello!
    I am 48 and not yet menopaused. I am interested in already now starting to strengthen my bones, by taking AlgaeCal and Strontium. I am having some issues with plantar fasciitis and possible arthritis in both thumbs. I am active and healthy otherwise, on no other medication. Should I take full dose or maybe half?
    Thankful for reply before I order. Best regards Jeanette

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Jeanette, At age 48, you are perimenopausal. Most of us begin the transition through menopause from age 48-52, so it’s great that you are being proactive about protecting your bones now, particularly since you are already experiencing conditions that indicate chronic inflammation (the plantar fascitis and arthritis). As woman age, we become more susceptible to “itis” (which means inflammation), in part because our estrogen production drops off. Estrogen exerts many anti-inflammatory effects, so as we produce less estrogen, our inflammatory potential goes up. And chronic low grade inflammation, regardless of its source, activates our bone-resorbing cells, which are called osteoclasts, continuously and thus promotes bone loss. I suggest you consider taking both AlgaeCal Plus and Triple Power. AlgaeCal Plus provides the key nutrients our bones must have to maintain themselves, regardless of our age, and in amounts shown in the research to be sufficient for most people. I believe it is a foundational health supplement for everyone — not only postmenopausal women. I have my son, a 30 year old M.D. currently doing his residency in Emergency Medicine; my daughter, who is 40 years old and an MS, RD nutritionist, and my husband, Dr. Joe Pizzorno, taking AlgaeCal Plus along with me — we all take the full dose daily. I highly recommend it for you as well. Also, I suggest you have your blood levels of vitamin D (25[OH]D) checked after you have been taking AlgaeCal Plus for 3 months just to be sure it is providing enough vitamin D for you. AlgaeCal Plus provides 1,600 iu of D3 daily, but some of us need more depending upon where we live (latitude impacts our ability to produce vitamin D from sun exposure) and our genetic inheritance, which can greatly affect our ability to maintain healthy levels of vitamin D, which, for 25(OH)D, should be in the range of 50-80 ng/mL. I also have my son, daughter and husband taking Triple Power along with me. Triple Power delivers EPA/DHA and two potent anti-inflammatory compounds — curcumin and astaxanthin. Unless you eat a lot of fish, you are almost certain to not be getting adequate EPA/DHA — the omega-3s that our bodies metabolize into compounds called the resolvins and protections because they resolve inflammation and protect us from chronic inflammation’s adverse effects. Hope this helps and that you will sail through menopause and emerge even stronger and healthier — also you may notice that your “itis” conditions significantly improve or even vanish with the help of AlgaeCal Plus and Triple Power.

  26. Andrea B.
    Andrea B.

    I have been taking AlgaeCal Plus for over 10 years (3-4 capsules daily). I am now 55 years old. Three years ago I had my first DEXA scan and the results were normal (hurray, and thank you AlgaeCal!!). I just had another DEXA scan and the results are also normal, but less good than 3 years ago. In order to not loose more bone, I decided to also take StrontiumBoost, which I just ordered. My question is should I take 1 or 2 capsules of Strontium, given that my DEXA results are in the normal range? Many thanks!

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Andrea, If you scan my post on strontium, you’ll see I discuss several studies done in Canada in which a half dose ( 1 capsule daily) of strontium citrate was used with excellent results. That’s what I recommend for you. And it’s what I do for myself. My bones have been in excellent shape now for more than 6 years (within 6 months after I started taking AlgaeCal Plus), but I continue to take a half dose (1 capsule) of Strontium Boost daily to ensure they stay healthy!

      1. Jane Maney
        Jane Maney

        So you take half the dosage of strontium (1 capsule) Do you still take the full dosage of algae cal plus (4 capsules)? Or do you half that too?

        I have a hard time with taking the strontium at night. I take 2 algae cal with dinner ( anywhere from 6-8pm). I have to wait 4 hours after meal to take stontium (right) so I have to stay up late or end up getting up in the middle of the night to take strontium. Any suggestions on when to take?

        1. Lara Pizzorno
          Lara Pizzorno

          Yes, I take the full dose (2 capsules twice daily) of AlgaeCal Plus, but now that my bones are in great shape, I only take a half dose (1 capsule) of Strontium Boost. I usually wake up in the middle of the night with a full bladder (one of the joys of now being 70 years old 🙂 and just take my strontium then. If you do not wake up at night, you can take your strontium during the day — you just want to take it when you are not also consuming calcium, so with a breakfast or lunch that does not contain calcium. Also, 3 hours should be enough time to wait after dinner to take your strontium. The reason 4 hours is recommended is that even if your digestion is slower than normal, you will have absorbed any calcium that was present in your meal or supplements by then. For most people, 3 hours or even 2 hours will be sufficient.

      2. Pen
        Pen

        Hi, I have been taking calcium, calcium rich foods and exercising to keep my bones strong, but my bone density test still show low bone density in my right hip.
        I found your product and started taking it this week, however when I take the Strontium at night, I get this weird pain in my right thumb, where the thumb joins the hand and I can’t use it to lift anything it is very weird. At first I thought it was a one time fluke, but it is happening every night. Could the Strontium be causing it and should I reduce the dose?

        1. Lara Pizzorno
          Lara Pizzorno

          This type of pain in your thumb is not due to strontium; it indicates arthritis in the joint. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thumb-arthritis/symptoms-causes/syc-20378339 Unfortunately, as we age, cumulative damage to our joints over the years, particularly when low levels of chronic inflammation are present (which also promote bone loss), starts to show up. Also, sometimes crystals can form and deposit in a joint — a thumb joint version of gout. https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/calcium-pyrophosphate-deposition-disease-cppd/ A few years ago now, I also started to experience pain in my thumb joints (and sometimes other fingers as well), which would clear out after a few days. I no longer have this problem because I treated the reasons for this pain — primarily by increasing my intake of anti-inflammatory omega-3s. I do this by taking Triple Power, which in addition to EPA/DHA, also contains two very powerful but safe anti-inflammatory agents: curcumin and astaxanthin. I suggest you take double the usual dose of Triple Power (so 2 TBS instead of one) for 6 weeks, then you may be able to drop down to 1 TBS without experiencing a recurrence of your thumb joint pain. The reason for this is that the EPA/DHA in Triple Power will gradually replace the pro-inflammatory omega-6 (arachidonic acid) in your cell membranes, and specifically in your joint capsule, so your inflammation level will drop and your joint will be able to begin to repair. One other supplement that may help is Ultimate Glucosamine (N-acetyl-D-Glucosamine) — this is the form in which glucosamine is used inside our joints. Hope this helps. Keep me posted, Lara

  27. Alma
    Alma

    Hi Lara,
    I just started taking AlgaeCal Feb. 10th – I scrolled on your FB page &a read something about too much Stronium is not good for kidneys? I might’ve read it too fast. I only have (1) one kidney so should I take the 2 supplements? or is 1 sufficient? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    The CountryLife calcium I was taking, was NOT doing it for me. I could feel a pin prick in my liver or kidney. Don’t know what that is from. And ever since being off it, I don’t feel it hardly anymore…
    Maybe it’s just me. I’m a vegetarian & eat healthy. My bloodwork is also great!

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Alma,
      If your kidney function is normal, then this is not an issue for you.
      It is an issue for individuals with chronic kidney disease.
      Strontium is eliminated by our kidneys, so it may accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidneys ability to filter the blood of EVERYTHING, not just strontium, is compromised.
      In patients with chronic renal failure, blood levels of strontium are increased four-fold when creatinine clearance is less than 50 mL/minute. Supplemental strontium should be avoided in individuals with a creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/minute or who are on dialysis. A creatinine clearance rate of 90 or greater indicates normal healthy kidney function. A creatinine clearance rate of 60-89 indicates the initial stage of kidney disease.
      Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine phosphate in muscle; it’s usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body and is eliminated in urine. How quickly our kidneys filter creatinine from the bloodstream, which is called the creatinine clearance rate, provides a measure of how effectively your kidneys are filtering your blood. (The creatinine clearance rate is also called the glomerular filtration rate because tiny capillaries in the basic structural and functional unit of the kidney, the nephron, are called glomerular capillaries.)

      Because people with chronic kidney disease are less able to remove waste and excess water from the blood, dialysis is used as an artificial way of carrying out this process. Dialysis fluids may already contain high concentrations of strontium, so not surprisingly, some dialysis patients are known to have elevated bone strontium concentrations and a high strontium/calcium ratio in bone. As a result, about 5% of dialysis patients develop osteomalacia (softening of the bones).
      However, osteomalacia is also frequently seen in end-stage renal failure patients who are not yet on dialysis and who have normal bone strontium levels. The reasons for this are that failing kidneys lose their ability to:
      • activate vitamin D (vitamin D is converted into its active, hormonal form –which is the form in which vitamin D helps us absorb calcium from the digestive tract–in the kidneys)
      •re-absorb calcium passing through the kidneys in the bloodstream instead of losing it in urine
      So the desired ratio of 2:1 calcium to strontium becomes harder to maintain.

  28. Michael Ho
    Michael Ho

    Hi Lara, I understand that Strontium Citrate do not cause blood clot. What about someone with coronary artery disease? Is it safe to take it.

    Thank you.
    Michael

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      No research indicates that strontium citrate would cause problems for someone with coronary artery disease; however, this is something you should definitely discuss with your doctor before taking strontium or calcium for that matter. It is extremely important that you are consuming optimal levels of vitamin K — both as K1 (phylloquinone) AND as K2 (menaquinone). K1 has significant anti-inflammatory effects. K2 is required to activate the proteins that regulate where calcium is deposited in your body: Osteocalcin, which delivers calcium to bone where you want it, and Matrix Gla protein, which prevents calcium from depositing in soft tissues — including your coronary arteries — where you don’t. Research conducted using K2 (360 micrograms of the MK-7 form of K2 daily) in individuals with cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease has even indicated removal of calcium deposits from the vasculature. And a large 2 year trial has just concluded using MK-7 to arrest the progression of coronary artery disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26516910 Hope this helps, Lara

      1. KATHY D RISNER
        KATHY D RISNER

        I have recently been diagnosed with coronary artery disease AND low bone mass. I was put on several new medications for the heart disease (blood thinner, beta blocker, aspirin, statin, and blood pressure!) Will the strontium interfere with these medications? Is it safe to take along with the heart meds? What about the AlgaeCal Plus? I need to make sure there is not any contradictions between the heart meds and supplements for bones. Thank you

        1. Megan AlgaeCal
          Megan AlgaeCal

          Hi Kathy, thanks for reaching out!

          Please do give us a call at 1-800-820-0184 where our Bone Health Consultants can go through your medication list to see how to best incorporate AlgaeCal into your current medication/supplement schedule. They can provide tailored information based on the specific medications you’re taking.

          Furthermore, with specific medical conditions, we highly recommend discussing AlgaeCal with your doctor.  We have a printable information sheet summarizing our products & the human clinical studies if you would like to share it with your doctor " rel="nofollow" rel="nofollow ugc">here.

          Hope this information helps!

          – Megan @ AlgaeCal

  29. Alison N.
    Alison N.

    I was wondering what your opinion on giving dogs canned sardines in water is. Specifically based on strontium levels and safety. I typically give my 75lb boxer a can of sardines once a week and I give it to him all at once. It’s usually a Friday or Saturday night treat for him. However, I just read a site from Dr. Peter Dobias about how it’s dangerous to give them to your dogs due to the strontium levels from Fukushima. Do you agree, disagree? Thanks!

    1. Jenna AlgaeCal
      Jenna AlgaeCal

      Hi Alison,

      Unfortunately, we aren’t familiar with the safety of canned sardines for dogs. Perhaps one of our readers will have insights to share with you! 🙂

      – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

    2. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      I disagree — actually, this attempt to frighten you into not giving your dog his weekly can of sardines is so over the top, it made me laugh. If you are a member of The AlgaeCal Community, please check out an #AskLara I taped entitled, “What can I believe?” In this video, I discuss in detail how to investigate assertions like the one you’ve sent in. In brief, check this person’s credentials (where did this man get his medical training? is he board certified, etc.?), then check the references he provides (probably none) to ensure the papers he is basing his claims upon actually say what he is using them to assert. Or don’t bother. Just enjoy giving your boxer his sardines. One other suggestion — we order our fish from Vital Choices (www.vitalchoices.com) You can look at their website, see their products and their excellent quality control. Probably a bit more expensive but worth it.

  30. Laura
    Laura

    Hello! I am turning 68 on July 1st and just started taking AlgaeCalPlus with the StrontiumBoost about a week ago. Thrilled to have found this which appears to be so promising. I do have low bone density in my spine (-2.5 T score) and also in my hips (-3.3 on one side, -3.0 on the other) so am pretty concerned at this point. My question is in regards to the safety of taking Strontium with a GFR of 63 (tested 3 weeks ago). Previous GFR readings over the past 10 years have been as low as 56 but seem to hover in the high 50’s to very low 60’s. I read in the discussion that a GFR of 50 or less would indicate that I should not take Strontium. If I do continue on it, will this contribute to a worsening of my existing kidney disease? Thanks so much!

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      If you have chronic kidney disease, you should not risk taking strontium. The ability of patients with CKD to clear strontium (and everything else requiring elimination in urine) is compromised. In addition, strontium may put more stress on the kidneys than other minerals because its larger size makes it difficult to reabsorb, so more is excreted. Our kidneys eliminate strontium far more quickly than calcium: three times as much strontium is lost in urine compared to calcium. My best advice for you is to focus on determining what factors are causing your CKD – get rid of them and HEAL. Our bodies have tremendous capacity to heal once the factors that are harming us are removed. Also, AlgaeCal Plus alone, or with Triple Power, which I definitely recommend especially for you because CKD indicates chronic inflammation, will support your bones ability to rebuild — just a bit more slowly without Strontium Boost, which, as it’s name implies, boosts the rate at which new bone is formed.

  31. Linda Kirwin
    Linda Kirwin

    I have been trying to take the Strontium Boost but it gives me headaches. I have tried taking it different times of day and I have tried taking only one capsule, either way I have a headache. When I stop taking it the headaches stop. Not happy about this and I see on another forum that other people have this problem, also. I am wondering what to do? Wondering what you might recommend? Would silica be a good supplement instead of Strontium?

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      The reason for your headaches is not the citrate. Strontium increases our absorption of calcium — yes, calcium! So when we take strontium if our diet is not providing adequate magnesium, we may need a bit more magnesium to maintain the optimal 2:1 balance between calcium and magnesium — this is the provided in AlgaeCal Plus. Try taking 150 mg of magnesium citrate along with one capsule of P-5-P (pyridoxal-5-phosphate) in the evening along with your Strontium Boost. P5P is the active form of B6, which helps our cells effectively absorb magnesium.

  32. kalpana S
    kalpana S

    Useful information. Strontium is a chemical element that naturally found in our body in small amounts. I observed three types of strontium salts and side effects of strontium supplements like nausea and headache etc. You have given some tips how much of dosage we have to take. Thanks for sharing. Springdale clinic where we can get suggestions on mental health issues.

    1. Megan AlgaeCal
      Megan AlgaeCal

      Glad you enjoyed the information, Kalpana!

      Thanks for sharing and we hope you enjoy some of our other blog articles 😊

      -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  33. Alice M.
    Alice M.

    I have been trying to take Algae Cal and Strontium Boost since mid-August. I have a history of IBS and have avoided gluten and used probiotics which has helped my GI tract to return to normal. When I tried both Algae Cal and Strontium as suggested I developed Gi loose bowels and discomfort. I backed off and started with just Algae Cal 2 capsules at breakfast and things went back to normal. I have found what works is 2 Algae Cal at breakfast, 1 at lunch, and 1 at dinner and all is well. However, even adding 1 Strontium at bedtime causes the loose bowels and squeezing discomfort to return. Do you have any suggestions?

    1. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Alice,
      For now, agreed, you should stop taking Strontium Boost. How is your digestion otherwise? I’m asking because the mineral strontium does not cause these effects, but the citrate provided by Strontium Boost, which is strontium citrate, can if some unfriendly bacteria are present in your digestive tract. Strontium citrate is 31% elemental strontium and 69% citrate. The two-capsule dose of strontium citrate = 680 mg, which provides 236 mg of elemental strontium + 440 mg of citrate. One capsule gives us 118 mg of strontium and 220 mg of citrate.

      For most everyone, citrate is REALLY good for us — it’s metabolized in the body as an alkalinizing agent — in other words, it promotes an alkaline pH inside our cells. Many cellular processes do not happen effectively in an acidic environment, and furthermore, an acidic pH (called metabolic acidosis) over activates osteoclasts and promotes bone loss. But, in people whose digestive tracts are infected with unfriendly bacteria, such as Clostridia, citrate can be co-opted by these bactera and used to fuel their metabolism. It turns out that citrate is a favorite food for Clostridia (C.difficile). https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1408913

      And the incidence of C. difficile infection has been increasing every year. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27855653 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27102582

      What all this means is that infection with Clostridia is not at all uncommon and in people who are infected with Clostridia, consuming citrate turns up the activity of this pathogenic bacteria, which produces and releases some really toxic stuff that can cause all the symptoms you mention.

      Clostridia infection in the U.S. is VERY common — back in 2011, at least half a million people were infected with C.difficile, In the U.S., average daily consumption of citrate is around 500 mg/d, so the full 2 capsule dose of adds another 680 mg, enough to make a difference. In addition, the 500 mg intake level for citrate is the average — this means that many people typically usually consume less citrate, so adding in Strontium Boost would have a bigger effect and those who typically consume less citrate and are carrying Clostridia would react.

      I discuss this on the AlgaeCal Community in an #AskLara on testing that identifies C.diff and other pathogens. https://www.facebook.com/lara.pizzorno.5/videos/10218830498263978/

      First, it’s best that you stop taking any Strontium Boost until you have no symptoms. Then after a few days, see if you can take 1 capsule daily without provoking symptoms. If you still have symptoms at this half dose, please ask your doctor about running a CDSA (Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis) or the OAT (a far more comprehensive test, the Organic Acids Test) to check what’s in your gut. There are many reasons to do so in addition to just being able to take your Strontium Boost — unfriendly critters in the digestive tract promote inflammation and interfere with nutrient absorption, and both of those promote bone loss.

  34. Pen
    Pen

    Hi, I have been taking calcium, calcium rich foods and exercising to keep my bones strong, but my bone density test still show low bone density in my right hip.
    I found your product and started taking it this week, however when I take the Strontium at night, I get this weird pain in my right thumb, where the thumb joins the hand and I can’t use it to lift anything it is very weird. At first I thought it was a one time fluke, but it is happening every night. Could the Strontium be causing it and should I reduce the dose?

    1. Patricia
      Patricia

      When I start getting strange movements and pain in my feet or hands a couple of hours or more after taking my Strontium, I quickly take my Algae Cal (Cal-Mag) and it goes away. I don’t mind the small inconvenience because I know I am rebuilding my bones.

      1. Megan AlgaeCal
        Megan AlgaeCal

        Hi Patricia, thanks for sharing!

        Strontium does indeed increase our absorption of calcium, which increases our need for magnesium (important for muscle and nerve function). So it could be that taking the AlgaeCal helps rebalance the magnesium in your body!

        -Megan @ AlgaeCal

        1. Elle
          Elle

          So would taking a magnesium tablet solve the problem?

          1. Megan AlgaeCal
            Megan AlgaeCal

            Hi Elle!

            Some people do require additional magnesium. We recommend trying to increase the magnesium in your diet as a first approach and have a handy list here that can help.

            -Megan @ AlgaeCal

    2. Lara Pizzorno
      Lara Pizzorno

      Hi Pen,

      Strontium Boost has 2 effects that might be contributing to your thumb pain:

      First, strontium increases our absorption of calcium, and when we absorb more calcium, we may need more magnesium if our diet is not providing a sufficient amount of magnesium to maintain a 2:1 calcium:magnesium balance. For this, you can try two things (1) ensure you are eating plenty of magnesium-rich foods (if you have a copy of Your Bones, I provide a table listing them and showing how much magnesium is in a typical serving of each food, p. 226. You can check Your Bones out from any public library if you don’t wish to own it — or you can run a Google search for foods rich in magnesium), and (2) you can take extra supplemental magnesium. AlgaeCal Plus is giving you 350 mg, an amount that perfectly balances the 720 mg of calcium it provides. You could try taking 150 mg of magnesium citrate along with your Strontium Boost.

      Secondly, Strontium Boost is strontium citrate. Citrate is a favorite food of unfriendly bacteria. If any of these critters are present in your digestive tract, which is extremely common, they will co-opt the citrate and use it to fuel their own activities. Their metabolic byproducts are highly inflammatory and cause damage to the gut wall, so they can get into your bloodstream and make their way to your joints, causing inflammation and pain.

      The thumb joint pain you describe does sound like arthritis. Our susceptibility to thumb joint pain increases as we age. I experience this off and on myself, particularly if I’ve been doing a lot of gardening, cooking, and housecleaning chores. (For more info on this, here’s a link to Mayo Clinic’s discussion of thumb arthritis: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thumb-arthritis/symptoms-causes/syc-20378339)

      For thumb joint pain due to arthritis, my recommendation is the same because magnesium helps dilate our blood vessels and improves blood flow.

      Reduce your dose of Strontium Boost to 1 capsule nightly along with 150 mg of magnesium citrate and see if this helps. After a week or so, you can try increasing to 2 capsules of Strontium Boost again.

      Hope this helps,

      Lara

      1. Sherry
        Sherry

        Lara
        I have been taking strontium citrate for 10 years. I had a “normal” DEXA for 2017 and 2019. I have read some articles about using a lower dose of strontium. I am confused what dose I should now be using. My last density, 2019, for the worse area was -.6 so depending on whose figures I use for strontium over showing on the DEXA I am in normal range or osteopenia. Would you share some studies with me (70 studies were mentioned in the article) that would clarify your decision to continue with the 682 mg dose as a maintenance dose. Thank you in advance for your help.

        1. Lara Pizzorno
          Lara Pizzorno

          Hi Sherry,

          Great to hear that you are definitely in normal range or in the one area you mention having a T score of -0.6, are barely osteopenic!

          For my post on strontium on AlgaeCal.com, I did review more than 70 studies, but not all the studies I cite there apply specifically to your question about an appropriate maintenance dose of strontium for you. The links below will take you to those papers that do include information that applies to your question.

          In articles posted on AlgaeCal.com and in #AskLara’s on our AlgaeCal Community, I always provide links to the studies that support what I am saying immediately after the statements made – although in checking the post on AlgaeCal.com, I see some of the references I provided have been removed, so only some are given in the links. I have added the ones that were removed that apply to your question in my comments below:

          As I have explained:

          Strontium is almost twice as large as calcium, and its larger size does affect DXA readings. In the research, approximately 50% of the increase seen in BMD over 3 years of treatment with strontium was due to strontium’s larger size, AND 50% of the increase seen in BMD was accurate. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15336592

          Strontium’s larger size than calcium’s also affects how quickly strontium is eliminated from the body. We lose strontium much more rapidly than calcium: three times as much strontium is lost in urine compared to calcium. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15336592 Plus, strontium is mainly incorporated onto the crystal surface of newly formed (trabecular) bone where one ion of strontium replaces less than one calcium ion out of 10. Trabecular bone is much more metabolically active than cortical bone, so when strontium treatment is stopped, the small number of strontium ions that were exchanged for calcium ions are soon released during normal healthy bone renewal, and this results in a rapid decrease in total bone strontium levels. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=11336927

          If you have read my posts on strontium or listened to the #AskLara’s in which I discuss strontium, you know that strontium greatly improves our ability to maintain healthy bones through MANY mechanisms –not by replacing calcium in our bones – so, even though your bones are now in good shape, to keep them healthy, continuing to take some strontium is a good idea.

          Since your bones are now in such good shape, however, I suggest you consider using only a half dose (1 capsule of Strontium Boost) daily instead of the full 2 capsule dose. This is what I began doing for myself several years ago now after I read – and reported in this post on AlgaeCal.com – that a half-dose was effective for maintenance. Here are links to this research (I see only one of the papers I cited is now provided as a link in the post on AlgaeCal.com. There were a series of studies run as part of the Ryerson and McMaster University Strontium in Bone Research Study in Toronto, Canada, that confirm this, so I am giving you links to several of these papers here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22549020 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26910208 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24434614

          FYI– the amount of strontium provided in the full dose is not 682 mg. Strontium Boost is strontium citrate, which is 31% elemental strontium and 69% citrate. The two-capsule dose of strontium citrate = 680 mg, which provides 236 mg of elemental strontium + 440 mg of citrate. One capsule gives you 118 mg of strontium and 220 mg of citrate.

          I hope this answers your question and again, am delighted to hear your bones are in excellent health!

          Lara

          1. Sherry Lamb
            Sherry Lamb

            Thank you Lara,

            Great information. Especially thanks for the links to research.

            If you do not object, I may use this information on some posts.

            I am trying to compile information on research on strontium citrate and this will greatly add to my body of information.

            Also, your answer gives me peace of mind in deciding to half my dose of strontium citrate. Thank you

            1. Blaire AlgaeCal
              Blaire AlgaeCal

              Glad you found Lara’s information helpful, Sherry! Feel free to use the information as you need 😊

              Any further questions, don’t hesitate!

              – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

          2. Sherry Lamb
            Sherry Lamb

            Lara
            I recently found this research study

            https://eje.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/eje/165/3/469.xml

            and was intrigued by table 1 in it.

            To me it seems to show, over a 5 year period, bone on strontium aging and becoming more infused with calcium and phosphorous and less with strontium.
            Am I understanding the new bone/old bone terminology correctly here.
            I am assuming that the new bone at 2 months is the old bone at 60 months or at least some of it is.

            But I do not know how the interstitial cortical bone and cancellous bone work in relationship to growing and becoming.
            Thanks for looking and for your input.

          3. Janet
            Janet

            Lara,

            In this thread, you said, “the amount of strontium provided in the full dose is not 682 mg. Strontium Boost is strontium citrate, which is 31% elemental strontium and 69% citrate. The two-capsule dose of strontium citrate = 680 mg, which provides 236 mg of elemental strontium + 440 mg of citrate.”

            This confuses me, because I thought “Strontium (from Strontium Citrate) – 680 mg” literally means there are 680 mg of strontium (not strontium citrate) in 2 capsules. My understanding is that Supplement Facts are required to list the amount of the element (in this case, strontium). If so, the label seems to indicate there are 680 mg of strontium in 2 capsules (and a higher amount of the strontium citrate compound). This appears to be how calcium is characterized on the AlgaeCal Plus label (it shows 360 mg of calcium “from algas calcareas”), and your referral in one comment to the 720-mg daily dose of calcium.

            Please tell me if I am not understanding this correctly. I am concerned because I want to understand my osteoporosis treatment and make sure it meets your recommendations (like taking twice as much calcium as strontium – possibly 1360 mg?)

            Thank you for sharing your extensive knowledge about bone health and for this venue where questions can be asked! You are now my go-to reference for bone health. 🙂

            1. Lara Pizzorno
              Lara Pizzorno

              Hi Janet,

              Sorry for the continuing confusion, but I now have the definitive information to answer your questions.
              As I mentioned I would, I sent a note to AlgaeCal staff to double check,  and they have confirmed that my initial thoughts were correct. Strontium Boost provides 680 mg of strontium citrate (not 680 mg of elemental strontium), in the 2 capsule dose. Strontium citrate is 31% elemental strontium and 69% citrate, so 2 capsules provide 236 mg of elemental strontium + 440 mg of citrate. One capsule gives us 118 mg of strontium and 220 mg of citrate.

              Regarding maintaining 2:1 balance with calcium, AlgaeCal Plus is giving you 720 mg of calcium, an amount more than sufficient to maintain the 2:1 balance between calcium and strontium recommended to ensure safe, effective use of strontium.  

              I hope this will fully clear up your confusion, and now that AlgaeCal is aware of the potential for misunderstanding, steps can be taken to make the label on Strontium Boost easier to understand correctly.

        2. Ellen
          Ellen

          Above you describe that secondly S booster can feed unfriendly bacteria. I’ve been getting abdominal discomfort, bloating and cramping. Can this be what’s going on? I’ve tried taking only one capsule, and even one half capsule with some mashed applesauce or banana. What else can be done so I can still take the s booster? Is there a treatment? Thank you!

          1. Blaire AlgaeCal
            Blaire AlgaeCal

            Hi Ellen,

            Thanks for reaching out!

            We’re so sorry to hear that you have been experiencing abdominal discomfort, bloating, and cramping – this certainly could be due to the citrate if you have an infection with any species of the pathogenic bacteria Clostridia. Many people have this infection and are not aware of it. Citrate is typically good for you; however, when you are infected with Clostridia, it feeds off of citrate, which is why you may experience symptoms like the ones you mentioned. Not to worry, this can be rectified! We recommend speaking with your doctor and potentially ordering an Organic Acids Test (OAT). You could also ask your doctor about running a stool test, preferably a Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis (CDSA). A CDSA is not as sophisticated as the OAT but it may be sufficient and it is more likely to be covered by insurance than the OAT. In the meantime, it’s best to cut back to just 1 capsule of Strontium Boost daily (if your body allows), or completely stop taking Strontium Boost until you know the cause.

            Hope that helps and that you feel better soon! Feel free to give our Bone Health Consultants a call at 1-800-820-0184 if you have further questions ❤️

            – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  35. Dianne McNeal
    Dianne McNeal

    I am intrigued by all this information. I’ve been taking AlgaeCal for a few years but stopped the Strontium last November because my husband thought it might be causing the all-over body aches I was having. My neurologist couldn’t find a cause but I haven’t started back up yet. I plan to do so. After reading some comments about citrates, some years ago I too Calcium Citrate and ended up with awful heart palpitations and thumping (the only way I know to describe it). I wore a Holter monitor for 24 hours but the doc didn’t find an issues. As soon as I stopped taking the Calcium Citrate, the thumping stopped. Strange….

    1. Megan AlgaeCal
      Megan AlgaeCal

      Hi Dianne, thanks for sharing and reaching out!

      As you’ve had a history of possibly reacting to citrate, we would recommend confirming with your doctor to see if Strontium Boost is appropriate for you at this time. If you do decide to reintroduce it, we would suggest trying a half dose (1 capsule) to start. Hope this helps and if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to our Bone Health Consultants at 1-800-820-0184 ❤️

      -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  36. Evawnq
    Evawnq

    Med

    1. Blaire AlgaeCal
      Blaire AlgaeCal

      Hi Evawnq,

      Let us know if you have any questions that we can help with! 😊

      – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  37. Jannakyg
    Jannakyg

    coin

    1. Blaire AlgaeCal
      Blaire AlgaeCal

      Hi Jannakyg,

      Let us know if you have any questions! 🙂

      – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

      1. Belen
        Belen

        I have hyponatremia. I take 3 grams of Sodium chloride each day. This was caused by taking diuretics for 17 yrs because I have Meniere’s Disease. My kidneys are getting old. The diuretics has been stopped. My doctor is trying to lessen my intake of sodium chloride.
        Can I take AlgaeCal & Strontium Boost ?
        I was diagnosed with osteoporosis last month & I started taking AgaeCal & Strontium Boost this month. Please advice.

        1. Megan AlgaeCal
          Megan AlgaeCal

          Hi Belen, thanks for reaching out!

          For specific medical conditions, we recommend checking in with your doctor to see if AlgaeCal is appropriate for you at this time. We have an excellent information sheet you can share with them HERE.

          Hope this helps and feel free to let us know if you have any other questions! ❤️

          -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  38. Alexftb
    Alexftb

    coin

    1. Blaire AlgaeCal
      Blaire AlgaeCal

      Hi Alexftb,

      Let us know if you have any questions! 🙂

      – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

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