Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 15, 2012

The effect leukemia has on the bones of cancer patients has been studied by researchers at the University of Rochester and a new perspective which is both thought-provoking and has surprise element to it has been arrived at. The study further sparks potential that therapies which treat bone disorders could aid in the treatment of leukemia. It also lays the foundations of a possible path that newly diagnosed leukemia patients be screened for osteoporosis. (1) Leukemia is a form of blood or bone marrow cancer in which there is an abnormal increase in the production of white blood cells. According to the Leukemia Research Foundation approximately 74,000 people in the U.S will have leukemia diagnosed for them out of which 21,000 may die of the disease.  (2) Blood stem cells are multi-potent in nature and give rise to all types…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 1, 2012

More insights were had on the possible development of osteoporosis through a study of deer antlers by researchers at Research Institute of Hunting Resources (University of Castilla La Mancha), Spain. We have long been reading literature about how important Vitamin D and magnesium are to calcium metabolization. This new study shows another dietary mineral plays a vital role in the osteoporosis equation and that is manganese. The study of deer antlers began when there was a marked increase in the reported breakage of deer antlers in 2005 in Spain. The study pointed out that it was not really the deficiency of dietary calcium that made antlers in deer weak, but low levels of dietary manganese caused the calcium to not ‘stick’ as it were causing poor quality antlers. In that particular year, due to an abnormally cold winter, the plants…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 1, 2012

A study conducted by the American College of Rheumatology over more than a decade brings out a fact that would startle many: 63% of women over 50 years of age experience either incidental, intermittent or persistent knee pain. Even more shocking is that as many as 27 million women over 25 years of age suffer from osteoarthritis in the US alone. Most likely direct causes have been found in being overweight, having a history of knee injury or early onset of radiographic osteoarthritis. The findings of this study has been published in the Wiley-Blackwell publication Arthritis & rheumatism and has set the medical fraternity abuzz with what the realities are and what they have to deal with in terms of management of the condition. Osteoarthritis is a joint disorder that occurs as we age and is generally caused by gradual…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Treatment / February 14, 2012

A small team of researchers from Cleveland’s Case Western Reserve University have put together a package that encases material that is identical to the ingredients that allow bone to re-grow and heal where there are injuries. The package is placed where bone needs to heal. The package is used as a storage and delivery tool for the nature-alike material to the fractures. (1) It has been observed that following this method of delivery heals serious bone injuries faster than any of the current methods used worldwide. The new technique also helps heal bone wounds that have no chance of healing if left to it’s own devices and such injuries where bone re-growth is expected to be very slow. As per Melissa Knothe Tate, a joint professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical & aerospace engineering at Case Western Reserve University, “We’re…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / February 14, 2012

A study on menopausal women in Europe has scientists reveal that as high as 70% of women in this category have low Vitamin D levels. The dip in percentage is very significant and has shocked the European medical fraternity.  This especially so because the percentage is seeing a steady dip without a reversing trend despite increased awareness among women in the last decade over the importance of Vitamin D and it’s bearing on bone health. As per the experts, a good level to be aimed at by menopausal women would be over 30 ng/ml (or nanograms per millilitre). This is also corroborated by the recommendation made by the Office of Dietary Supplements on Vitamin D. They clearly state that persons are potentially at risk for inadequacy at levels ranging from 12–20 ng/mL and that all people are sufficient at levels…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / January 10, 2012

A recent study conducted by the orthopaedic surgeons at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that those spinal fusion surgery patients who were deficient in Vitamin D before the surgery had a long recovery phase. Spinal fusion surgery is a major surgery that is usually recommended to remove the spinal canal of bone and tissue material obstructing/narrowing the canal or squeezing the spinal cord. The surgery lasts several hours and is also prescribed to correct fractures of the spine and treat herniated discs, tumors etc. (1) The findings of the Washington University School of Medicine were presented in the 26th Annual Meeting of the North American Spine Society. The study had examined 313 spinal fusion surgery patients and found that more than 50% of them had low Vitamin D levels that made the recovery phase for…

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Nutrition / Research / Strontium / January 10, 2012

Osteopenia and osteoporosis patients are often confused when their doctor recommends strontium for them. Patients then typically read up information about strontium, come across sensational write ups that misinform and create fear for Strontium. Doctors usually prescribe either of the two variants strontium ranelate or strontium citrate. After doing some of their own spade work, patients then begin to wonder why they were not prescribed the other form. First let’s begin by dispelling the fear of strontium. Strontium is a naturally occurring silvery white or yellowish mineral found in the soil, and it has some serious health benefits. People who consume organic and farm produce usually get enough of this mineral and do not require strontium supplements. You can find out more about strontium-rich foods on our dedicated strontium food sources page. In it’s natural state strontium is a stable…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / January 3, 2012

The anatomical structure and the working of a ‘molecular motor’ has now been identified whose malfunctioning is believed to be responsible for the onset of many critical diseases and health conditions such as osteoporosis and even cancer. The motor is an energy-converting protein known as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Every cell in our body contains this cell which is used to produce energy for the organs for our body to function. The ATP synthase protein interacts with the fatty acids that surround it. The fatty acids form membranes around each cell giving the cell mechanical protection from physical shock. It also provides structural support for the cell as well as acts as a semi-permeable barrier to other surrounding cells. The function of the fatty acids is to act like a lubricant for the functioning of this molecular motor. (1) The…

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