Living with Spinal Osteoporosis: What You Need to Know

Living with Spinal Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis and Spine Fractures | Causes and Symptoms of Osteoporosis in the Spine | Osteoporosis Spine Exercises | FAQs

If you – or someone you know and love – suffer from the pain and torment of Spinal Osteoporosis, know these facts:

You are not alone.

There are measures you can take to alleviate your pain.

There are measures you can take to regain bone density, even in your spine.

Today, we will discuss some of the risk factors involved with Spinal Osteoporosis, the terminology used by the medical community (and what they mean in plain English), measures you can take after diagnosis and even vertebral fracture, plus one thing you can do to help reduce your risk of losing vital vertebral bone density.

Osteoporosis and Spine Fractures

Simply put, the numbers are frightening.

  • A 50 year old white woman has a 16% lifetime risk of experiencing a vertebral fracture whereas a 50 year old white man’s lifetime risk is 5%.(1) 
  • A woman 65 years of age with one vertebral fracture has a one in four chance of another fracture over 5 years, which can be reduced to one in eight by treatment.(2) 
  • Vertebral fractures can lead to back pain, loss of height, deformity, immobility, increased number of bed days, and even reduced pulmonary function.(3)(4)(5) Their impact on quality of life can be profound as a result of loss of self-esteem, distorted body image and depression.(6)(7)(8)(9)  Vertebral fractures also significantly impact on activities of daily living.(10)(11) 
  • After hospitalization for a vertebral fracture, there is a greatly increased risk of requiring hospitalization for a further fracture in the years following initial hospitalization.(12) 
  • Women who develop a vertebral fracture are at substantial risk for additional fracture within the next 1-2 years.(13)(14) 
  • It is estimated that only one-third of vertebral fractures come to clinical attention(15) and under-diagnosis of vertebral fracture is a worldwide problem. The proportion of vertebral fractures that go unrecognized is as high as 46% in Latin America, 45% in North America, and 29% in Europe/South Africa/Australia.(16) 

Women, especially those older than 50, are at greatest risk for spine fractures. By age 80, about 40% of women have had a spinal fracture. Estimates put the number of vertebral fractures that occur each year in the United States at about 700,000.

Men can also have a spinal fracture, and women and men who have osteoporosis have an even greater risk of spine fractures.

Age obviously plays a major role in spine fractures. As you age, your bones may become increasingly thinner and weaker. This is what leads to osteoporosis – and when it is focused on the bones in your vertebra, it’s called Spinal Osteoporosis.  

Believe it or not, simply the effort required to just hold your body erect can be enough to cause a spinal fracture when someone has Spinal Osteoporosis.

Causes and Symptoms of Osteoporosis In The Spine

The pain caused by Spinal Osteoporosis can affect many areas of your daily life. The pain can range from a sudden, sharp and severe pain from walking or simply standing, to pain and difficulty and pain when you twist, turn or bend.

But when osteoporosis becomes severe, it can lead to fractures and a condition called kyphosis. Kyphosis is a deformity resulting from spinal compression fractures, sometimes described as the “dowager’s hump.” Both fractures and kyphosis can be very painful.

Spinal OsteoporosisMost people describe having pain in their bones and muscles, particularly in their back but also hips, arms, ribs and knees.

The level of pain differed and while many people deal with some level of pain on a regular basis it was particularly challenging for those who suffered severe pain due to collapsed vertebrae.

Also it may take longer for people to recover from the emotional effect of pain and normalize their everyday activities again. (Many adults compare themselves with others in their peer group and because they could no longer be as active, their self esteem was affected.)

Let’s take a look at a few more terms(17)  relevant to your spine.

Centrum – The body of a vertebra.

Cervical – The neck region of the spine containing the first seven vertebrae.

Fatigue Fracture – A fracture that occurs in bone as a result of repeated stress as opposed to a single injury.

Internal Fixation – The immobilization of bone fragments or joints with implants in order to promote healing or fusion.

Lumbar – The lower part of the spine between the thoracic region and the sacrum. The lumbar spine consists of five vertebrae

Minimally Invasive Surgery – Surgery requiring small incision(s), usually performed with tiny cameras.

Spine – The flexible bone column extending from the base of the skull to the tailbone. It is made up of 33 bones, known as vertebrae. The first 24 vertebrae are separated by discs known as intervertebral discs, and bound together by ligaments and muscles. Five vertebrae are fused together to form the sacrum and 4 vertebrae are fused together to form the coccyx. The spine is also referred to as the vertebral column, spinal column, or backbone.

Vertebra – One of the 33 bones of the spinal column. A cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebra has a cylindrical shape on one side and an arch on the other. The plural of vertebra is vertebrae.

Osteoporosis Spine Exercises

Can You Ease your Back Pain with Exercise?

A typical response to experiencing back pain is to take it easy – either stay in bed or at least stop any activity that is at all strenuous. While this idea is understandable and may even be recommended in the short term, when done for more than a day or two it can actually undermine healing. Instead, active forms of back exercises are almost always necessary to rehabilitate the spine and help alleviate back pain.

A regular routine of lower back exercises helps you avoid stiffness and weakness, minimize recurrences of lower back pain, and reduce the severity and duration of possible future episodes.

A balanced workout of back exercises should include a combination of stretching, strengthening, and low-impact aerobic conditioning.


Keep the following in mind when starting a stretching routine as part of a program of back exercises:

  • Wear comfortable clothes that won’t bind
  • Stretching should be pain free; do not force the body into difficult positions
  • Move into the stretch slowly and avoid bouncing, which may actually tear muscles
  • Stretch on a clean, flat surface that is large enough to move freely
  • Hold stretches long enough (20-30 seconds) to allow muscles or joints to become loose
  • Repeat the stretch, generally 5-10 times

(If you already have low back pain or neck pain, and before starting any new physical activity, it is best to check with a physician or physical therapist.)

Back Exercise Stretches

Many back pain patients know the feeling of tension in the back, especially first thing in the morning. These stretching back exercises can help bring back some suppleness and increase mobility, decreasing back pain and discomfort.

For more osteoporosis exercises, go here.

Osteoporosis Spine FAQ’s

How can spinal osteoporosis be treated?

There are several treatment options:

  • Prescription Medications:Doctors may prescribe medication to relieve pain. There is a long list of potential drugs, and most have both benefits and negative side-effects.
  • Exercise: Several exercise options appear above. Check with your doctor before starting a new fitness program.
  • Strontium Treatment for Osteoporosis: If you are concerned about the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis, one treatment you may have heard of and considered is strontium. It has an excellent history of building bone density.

Osteoporosis Myth: Once You Get Osteoporosis, No Treatment Helps

If diagnosed, osteoporosis can be treated with a variety of new osteoporosis medications and supplements that help to prevent bone loss and rebuild bone. These osteoporosis treatments (such as AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost) can substantially reduce your risk of developing dangerous and potentially deadly bone fractures.

What does a fractured vertebrae look like?

When more pressure is put on a bone than it can stand, it will break. The most common type of spine fracture is a vertebral body compression fracture (below.) Sudden downward force shatters and collapses the body of the vertebrae. If the force is great enough, it may send bone fragments into the spinal canal, called a burst fracture.

What is a vertebral fracture?

vertebral compression fracture occurs when the block-like part of an individual bone of the spine (vertebra) becomes compressed due to trauma. Usually the trauma necessary to break the bones of the spine is quite substantial. However, in people with osteoporosis, the stress required for the fracture can be minimal – as little as standing for extended periods of time.

Are There Ways to Reduce the Risk of Spinal Osteoporosis?

The equation is rather simple: increase bone density to reduce the risk of Spinal osteoporosis.

The most common element required is calcium – the core material of bones. As children, we drank milk to get not only the calcium our bones need, but also the vitamins and trace minerals that better activate the healthy actions of the calcium.

After we pass our mid-30’s, our natural body bone-building machinery starts to not only stop working, but actually go into reverse. We lose about 1% bone density per year after age 35. (Post menopausal women can lose as much as 5% per year.)

It’s easy to see that taking action soon after that 40th birthday is your best course for risk reduction.

Clinically tested and proven effective is the combination of AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost.

AlgaeCal Plus has the additional benefit of being plant-derived, and ingesting a natural plant source of calcium is always better than rock-based calcium. AlgaeCal Plus adds Vitamin D and K2, plus magnesium. These three ingredients facilitate the delivery of the calcium directly to the bone and the increases the absorption and retention of calcium in your body.

Strontium Boost delivers exactly what the label says: a boost of strontium to your bones. This element is critical in building, and rebuilding, bone density.  

And here’s a little extra bonus…

These products not only reduce your risk of developing Spinal Osteoporosis, but can actually help you recover more quickly from bone density loss – even help you recover more quickly from spinal fractures.

We recommend you check out AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost when you click here.

  1. Melton LJ, 3rd, Chrischilles EA, Cooper C, et al. (1992) Perspective. How many women have osteoporosis? J Bone Miner Res 7:1005.
  2. Kaptoge S, Armbrecht G, Felsenberg D, et al. (2004) When should the doctor order a spine X-ray? Identifying vertebral fractures for osteoporosis care: results from the European Prospective Osteoporosis Study (EPOS). J Bone Miner Res 19:1982.
  3. Nevitt MC, Ettinger B, Black DM, et al. (1998) The association of radiographically detected vertebral fractures with back pain and function: a prospective study. Ann Intern Med 128:793.
  4. Lips P, Cooper C, Agnusdei D, et al. (1999) Quality of life in patients with vertebral fractures: validation of the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO). Working Party for Quality of Life of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 10:150.
  5. Pluijm SM, Dik MG, Jonker C, et al. (2002) Effects of gender and age on the association of apolipoprotein Eepsilon4 with bone mineral density, bone turnover and the risk of fractures in older people. Osteoporos Int 13:701.
  6. Gold DT (2001) The nonskeletal consequences of osteoporotic fractures. Psychologic and social outcomes. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 27:255.
  7. Robbins J, Hirsch C, Whitmer R, et al. (2001) The association of bone mineral density and depression in an older population. J Am Geriatr Soc 49:732.
  8. Lyles KW (2001) Osteoporosis and depression: shedding more light upon a complex relationship. J Am Geriatr Soc 49:827.
  9. Tosteson AN, Gabriel SE, Grove MR, et al. (2001) Impact of hip and vertebral fractures on quality-adjusted life years. Osteoporos Int 12:1042.
  10. Hall SE, Criddle RA, Comito TL, Prince RL (1999) A case-control study of quality of life and functional impairment in women with long-standing vertebral osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporos Int 9:508.
  11. Adachi JD, Ioannidis G, Olszynski WP, et al. (2002) The impact of incident vertebral and non-vertebral fractures on health related quality of life in postmenopausal women. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 3:11.
  12. Johnell O, Oden A, Caulin F, Kanis JA (2001) Acute and long-term increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for vertebral fracture. Osteoporos Int 12:207.
  13. Lindsay R, Silverman SL, Cooper C, et al. (2001) Risk of new vertebral fracture in the year following a fracture. JAMA 285:320.
  14. Roux C, Fechtenbaum J, Kolta S, et al. (2007) Mild prevalent and incident vertebral fractures are risk factors for new fractures. Osteoporos Int 18:1617.
  15. Cooper C, Atkinson EJ, O’Fallon WM, Melton LJ, 3rd (1992) Incidence of clinically diagnosed vertebral fractures: a population-based study in Rochester, Minnesota, 1985-1989. J Bone Miner Res 7:221.
  16. Delmas PD, van de Langerijt L, Watts NB, et al. (2005) Underdiagnosis of vertebral fractures is a worldwide problem: the IMPACT study. J Bone Miner Res 20:557.

11 thoughts on “Living with Spinal Osteoporosis: What You Need to Know

Pat linton

My mother died of an osteoporosis related death. I have been diagnosed with osteoporosis of the spine at the age of 58. I believe in treating this through Pilates and supplements,etc and I really want to continue to use your products. But I struggle with the idea of the lanolin in your products.
I would really would look Iove if you offered algae Cal without vitamin d unless it was vit d2 or lichen based d3. Help?


Hi Pat,

I understand your concern and appreciate your feedback.

However, I would not recommend vitamin D2 for supplementation. Unfortunately vitamin D2 is inferior to its natural form vitamin D3 and that is why we choose vitamin D3 in AlgaeCal. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has pointed out that vitamin D2, “should not be regarded as a nutrient suitable for supplementation or fortification.” There are many reasons. One reason being that Vitamin D3 is the form that is produced in our skin when we are exposed to sunlight, D2 is not. Also, D3 is more biologically active, it is more potent and it is a higher quality supplement than vitamin D2. Further, there have been very few studies done on D2 to prevent bone fractures in adults while D3 has had many studies showing its safety and efficacy for bone health.

We are always receptive to our customer feedback and will look into a vegan alternative for D3. Hopefully in the future we can provide it.

– Monica from AlgaeCal

Marlene Moore Gordon

Hi I just puchase your product to stop osteoporosis and plan on taking as directed
Since I already have some bone loss at age 62, I am very concerned. ..I have a small frame and I am Caucasian
I do exercise regularly. ..and have a healthy diet. The other rock products are very constipating….don’t like idea of rocks in my body.
I am concerned to add the strontium product never heard of it anywhere. I need to take that now or can i wait to see the results of the algae cal first? After my next bone scan in one year…
Also expense is an issue for me right now
Anyway To Buy Larger Amounts FOR Reduced price? Since this is a long term need to take supplement?
Have you thought of combing both products into one product?

Thanks so much for creating such an important product for all of us who need this!!

Look forward to hearing back.

Thanks very much marlene gordon
201 280 3364 pst


Hi Marlene,

Here is an excellent article on strontium:

Ideally, if you have osteoporosis, Strontium Boost is recommended in addition to AlgaeCal Plus. (Explained in the article above) The good news is, we do offer significant discounts when you buy more than one bottle as yes, you are correct, it should be used as a long-term supplement. You can see these discounts reflected on our product pages:

AlgaeCal Plus and Strontium Boost cannot be combined. Strontium and calcium compete for absorption so they cannot be taken together. That’s why they are separate products and we recommend you take them at least 3 hours apart.

Please let me know if you have any further questions, Marlene!

– Monica from AlgaeCal

Shirley O jones

I broke my thoracic spine about 2 years ago I broke”3″ T bones now I have Osteoporosis.i stay in pain all the time the Doctor has men on pain med sometime it works and sometimes I don’t completed release.i walk everyday and do strengthens .What Elise can I do to help with pain. I still do many activities such as yoga blalanceing extra cites.


Hi Shirley,

Sorry to hear about your pain. It sounds like you are doing quite a bit in terms of exercise, which is great. I’d recommend speaking to your health specialist or a physical trainer. They will be able to fully assess your health history, physical limitations, complete a thorough exam and provide a course of action to hopefully relieve some of that pain.

– Monica from AlgaeCal

Miriam McCune Ford

Bilateral hip fractures , femur , tibia , radius , ribs , 12 thoracic vertebrae , 2 lumbar vertebrae, bilateral knee buckle fractures. I’m bedbound in a nursing home. Constant pain. All began at age 52. I had a hyperthyroidectomy. I’m taking calcium and vitamin D . I take Prolia 2 x yearly . Unable to do physical therapy. I yawned , stretched and fx my tibia ,while in bed . Any hope for me ? Thanks.


Hi Miriam.

I have taken your comment to expert Lara Pizzorno, author of “Your Bones”. Here is her response:

“There is ALWAYS hope. Our bodies are constantly remaking themselves and doing the very best they can for us with what they have to work with and in response to what they are being challenged by.

It’s difficult to provide comprehensive suggestions without knowing why you had a thyroidectomy. However, given your current condition, I can definitely suggest the following:

– You should be working with an endocrinologist knowledgeable about hormone replacement. Since you had your thyroid removed, you must be on thyroid hormone replacement already, but you should have your thyroid hormone and TSH levels checked to ensure they are at a correct level and neither too high or too low. And, given your age and condition, you should absolutely check into Bio-identical Hormone Replacement for estrogen, progesterone and DHEA as well.

– The easiest way for you to learn about this is to get a copy of Your Bones and read pgs. 318-321 that discusses in full the best lab test for these hormones.
You should begin taking AlgaeCal Plus immediately – your bones require the nutrients in AlgaeCal Plus to rebuild successfully. Prolia does not provide them. You should read the section in Your Bones on Prolia (denosumab) to understand why it may not be the best option for you – pgs. 52-66.

– You should also start taking Triple Power 2 tablespoons daily –y ou really need the anti-inflammatory and bone-building effects of the omega-3s (and the curcumin and astaxanthin) it provides.

– You should check into working with a physical therapist who can help you do your exercises in bed and eventually give you a set you can do herself. I also hope you are eating REALLY well – I don’t know if you can have access to organic foods, but if at all possible, you should be eating a whole foods, primarily organic diet.

There is ALWAYS hope. You need to be working with a physician who knows this and will help you.

Sending a big hug. – Lara”

– Monica from AlgaeCal


I ordered the combination of AlgaeCal and Strontium 3 mos. and been taking the AlgaeCal only but not the Strontium, for the following reason: I was scheduled for L3,4,5 spinal surgery due to slippage-grade 1 but was delayed until my “osteoporosis” is taken care of. My Endocrinologist advised against taking Strontium bec. it makes the bone dense but easily cracks (this is how I interpreted what I heard anyway). I was prescribed Boniva once a month. I’m hoping to have a positive result at my next bone scan in October, so that I can proceed with surgery. It is my last resort of dealing with my daily chronic pain and nerve pain. I’ve been dealing with this for two years now and is getting worse. I’ve done “all” kinds of therapies since I started feeling the symptoms including Traditional Chinese Medicine plus all types of herbal supplements for pain,etc.
Any thoughts or advise regarding the strontium? Thank you!


Hi Olga,

The following article is a fantastic resource and should answer all of your strontium questions:

In addition, Strontium has been studied for up to 7 years in our recent study – with no adverse side effects. It is a safe and effective addition to your bone-building regimen. (The study, here:

Let me know if you have any further questions!

– Monica from AlgaeCal

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