AlgaeCal Blog

AlgaeCal Blog

Bone-Healthy Living / Treatment / February 14, 2012

A small team of researchers from Cleveland’s Case Western Reserve University have put together a package that encases material that is identical to the ingredients that allow bone to re-grow and heal where there are injuries. The package is placed where bone needs to heal. The package is used as a storage and delivery tool for the nature-alike material to the fractures. (1) It has been observed that following this method of delivery heals serious bone injuries faster than any of the current methods used worldwide. The new technique also helps heal bone wounds that have no chance of healing if left to it’s own devices and such injuries where bone re-growth is expected to be very slow. As per Melissa Knothe Tate, a joint professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical & aerospace engineering at Case Western Reserve University, “We’re…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / February 14, 2012

A study on menopausal women in Europe has scientists reveal that as high as 70% of women in this category have low Vitamin D levels. The dip in percentage is very significant and has shocked the European medical fraternity.  This especially so because the percentage is seeing a steady dip without a reversing trend despite increased awareness among women in the last decade over the importance of Vitamin D and it’s bearing on bone health. As per the experts, a good level to be aimed at by menopausal women would be over 30 ng/ml (or nanograms per millilitre). This is also corroborated by the recommendation made by the Office of Dietary Supplements on Vitamin D. They clearly state that persons are potentially at risk for inadequacy at levels ranging from 12–20 ng/mL and that all people are sufficient at levels…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / January 10, 2012

A recent study conducted by the orthopaedic surgeons at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that those spinal fusion surgery patients who were deficient in Vitamin D before the surgery had a long recovery phase. Spinal fusion surgery is a major surgery that is usually recommended to remove the spinal canal of bone and tissue material obstructing/narrowing the canal or squeezing the spinal cord. The surgery lasts several hours and is also prescribed to correct fractures of the spine and treat herniated discs, tumors etc. (1) The findings of the Washington University School of Medicine were presented in the 26th Annual Meeting of the North American Spine Society. The study had examined 313 spinal fusion surgery patients and found that more than 50% of them had low Vitamin D levels that made the recovery phase for…

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Nutrition / Research / Strontium / January 10, 2012

Osteopenia and osteoporosis patients are often confused when their doctor recommends strontium for them. Patients then typically read up information about strontium, come across sensational write ups that misinform and create fear for Strontium. Doctors usually prescribe either of the two variants strontium ranelate or strontium citrate. After doing some of their own spade work, patients then begin to wonder why they were not prescribed the other form. First let’s begin by dispelling the fear of strontium. Strontium is a naturally occurring silvery white or yellowish mineral found in the soil, and it has some serious health benefits. People who consume organic and farm produce usually get enough of this mineral and do not require strontium supplements. You can find out more about strontium-rich foods on our dedicated strontium food sources page. In it’s natural state strontium is a stable…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / January 3, 2012

The anatomical structure and the working of a ‘molecular motor’ has now been identified whose malfunctioning is believed to be responsible for the onset of many critical diseases and health conditions such as osteoporosis and even cancer. The motor is an energy-converting protein known as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Every cell in our body contains this cell which is used to produce energy for the organs for our body to function. The ATP synthase protein interacts with the fatty acids that surround it. The fatty acids form membranes around each cell giving the cell mechanical protection from physical shock. It also provides structural support for the cell as well as acts as a semi-permeable barrier to other surrounding cells. The function of the fatty acids is to act like a lubricant for the functioning of this molecular motor. (1) The…

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Nutrition / Nutrition / December 13, 2011

Americans spend $27 billion on dietary supplements, according to the Council for Responsible Nutrition, and supplement use is on the rise.  According to the CDC between 1988 and 1994 one third of the population took a supplement.  By 2006, over half the population was taking a supplement. In women over aged 60, calcium supplement usage has increased exponentially.  Between 1988-1994 only 28% of women aged 60+ were taking calcium, but between 2003 and 2006 that percentage had grown to 61%. Supplements can be an excellent way to fill in dietary gaps and imbalances, as long as they are high quality.  Buying the cheapest supplement on the shelf will likely backfire, as many nutritional supplements use the lowest cost ingredients, or are lacking the necessary co-factors for absorption. The cheapest calcium supplement at the drugstore will probably be a form of calcium that is not…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Exercise / Research / December 13, 2011

While most of the focus on obesity is from the perspective of the risks it adds to a person’s cardiovascular health, chances of developing diabetes, sleep apnea, certain cancer types and other medical conditions, it has now come to light that obesity also plays a major role in pegging your risk of developing osteoporosis and osteoarthritis later in life. Researchers from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy (Gothenburg University) have carried out a study which revealed that the body’s obesity-related hormone called adiponectin was responsible for increased risk of fractures as well as osteoporosis. (1) Obesity is an adverse medical condition where the body accumulates excessive fat and puts it to risk for various health problems and in some cases life expectancy. Obesity is usually managed by improving the lifestyle of the effected person through better eating habits, improving food quality, exercising and…

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Nutrition / Nutrition / December 13, 2011

Overweight and obese premenopausal women who are on severe diets can now draw hope from the recent findings which show that increasing the proportion of dairy foods in their diet could keep their calorie count low and yet not affect their bone health adversely. Studies on bone mass conducted several years ago showed that a higher body weight contributed towards greater bone mass and so when persons go on diet to curb weight gain or reduce weight, they compromise their bone health. Though effects of factors such as dairy intake (for calcium and protein) and exercise on bone health were individually studied independent of each other, there were no cases that observed their combined effect on overweight and obese premenopausal women. Now, a new study conducted by the McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario has a report which has been accepted…

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Nutrition / Omega 3 / Research / December 2, 2011

Latest research conducted by a team of scientists at the University of Bristol shows that there are signs of an omega 3 osteoarthritis link. How so? Osteoarthritis seems to be greatly reduced by the intake of Omega 3 found in fish oils. The study points that the difference fish oil omega 3 makes to symptoms of osteoarthritis are both significant and substantial. How the Omega 3 Osteoarthritis Connection Works Osteoarthritis (or degenerative joint disease) is a type of arthritis where there is a breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in one or more joints of our limbs. The cause of the disease is not yet known. However, wear and tear of joints, heredity, obesity and occurrence of fracture could trigger the condition. The treatment is limited to pain relief and joint replacement. (1) The University of Bristol study (funded by Arthritis…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / December 2, 2011

Research from Case Western University now suggests that most humans are doomed to develop backbone fractures as they age and evolution from apes to humans is to blame. Though osteoporosis is often cited as the cause for backbone fractures, the researchers at the university find the structure of our spine the real culprit. (1) If we take a look at the anatomy of our vertebrae or backbone and compare it with that of apes, we will see that our backbone is more porous than apes. It is also much larger than their’s. However, unlike apes, our backbone is encased in a significantly thinner case of shell made of bone. In apes, the encasing shell is much thicker and so it remains intact for longer even as apes age. As long as humans are young and the bone loss phenomenon has…

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