Bone Healthy Living / Osteoporosis / March 14, 2016

Primary Vs. Secondary – The Types of Osteoporosis Types of Osteoporosis | Primary Osteoporosis | Causes of Secondary Osteoporosis | Primary and Secondary Osteoporosis treatment Options  There are four types of osteoporosis: primary osteoporosis, secondary osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis. From there, the two main types of osteoporosis common in adults are: primary and secondary osteoporosis. Primary osteoporosis is known as either being age-related osteoporosis, or an unknown cause.(1)  This is the most common form of osteoporosis.  Why?  The biggest factor is age.  As you know, once you reach peak bone mass you begin to lose 1% of your total bone density, annually.  This is coupled with the fact that as you also get older, your ability to build bone also decreases.  Bone loss increases, bone building decreases.  A dangerous cocktail. There are two types of primary osteoporosis: type 1 and type 2. Type…

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PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Dean Neuls, AlgaeCal Inc. Skype: Dean.AlgaeCal E-mail: [email protected] Algae-derived calcium reverses age-related decline in bone mass only slowed by other calcium supplements New Findings of 7-Year Study Reported in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition Vancouver, BC, March 9, 2016 — After midlife, normal age-related annual bone loss is about -1%.  Traditional calcium supplements may slow, but do not reverse, this age-related bone loss.(1)  Now, a new 7-year longitudinal study, published in the February 2016 issue of The Journal of the American College of Nutrition, suggests a vitamin-mineral enhanced plant-based calcium supplement, AlgaeCal (AC) can produce a positive change in bone mineral density sufficient to outpace age-related bone loss.(2)  Results of this 7-year study show that AC produced consistent and linear gains in BMD, averaging 1.04% per year over the full duration of the…

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Osteoporosis in Women According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about eight million or 80% are women!   Why Women Are More Likely to Develop Osteo | Causes/Symptoms |Treatment Options Why Are Women More Likely to Develop Osteoporosis? Well for starters, women start out with less bone density than men and typically have smaller, thinner bones. As mentioned earlier, estrogen plays a vital role in women’s bone health. This applies to men as well. However due to higher bone density and without the drastic decline in estrogen during  menopause, men have an advantage over osteoporosis that unfortunately, we as women do not. This does not mean our male counterparts are off the hook entirely. It just means that men are more likely to be diagnosed with osteoporosis later in life.  Typically around 65 to 70…

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This article will explain how to use your Omega-6: Omega-3 diet diary, which was briefly explained in the last article, “How To Determine YOUR Omega 3 Needs.” To determine how much supplemental EPA/DHA you need for optimal health, what matters most is that you are consuming enough EPA/DHA to maintain proper balance with your intake of AA. Experts vary in their opinion of what this optimal balance should be. Many say a ratio of omega-6: omega-3 of 4:1 is good; others believe that the optimal balance is 2:1. How much of the parent compounds of the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids — linoleic acid (LA) is the parent omega-6 and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) is the parent omega-3 — you are consuming has much less impact on your omega-6: omega-3 ratio than how much of the pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acid,…

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What are your omega 3 needs? Well, the answer is different for each individual. But don’t fret. This article will help you determine how much omega-3s you need each day. The amount you need to achieve an omega-6: omega-3 ratio of no greater than 4:1.   One way to do this is to take the dose recommended on the label of the omega-3 supplement you choose. After three months, check to see where your omega-6: omega-3 ratio is by re-taking the Omega Quant Omega-3 Index test. Then, you will have enough information to estimate your omega-3 dosage needs. But, if you want to determine more precisely what your optimal omega-3 dose should be… You’ll need to do the following exercise, which will take you about 10 minutes each day for 5 days. But more on that in a minute. Why…

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Bone Healthy Living / Osteoporosis / February 19, 2016

What is a Fracture? Fractures, also known as bone fractures, is the medical term for a broken bone. This guide will cover the many types of bone fractures that may occur. How to understand the bone fracture healing process. It’s signs and symptoms. And also how to treat it safely and effectively.   Types of Fractures | Bone Fracture Healing| Symptoms and Treatment| FAQ’s Types of Bone Fractures There are many types of fractures, but the most common are simple fractures and compound fractures. Simple Fracture: Also called a closed fracture. This is when there is no open wound on the skin, the bone has not pierced it. Simple fractures include: Greenstick fracture: This is when the bone is bent and has not completely fractured. Transverse fracture: This is when the break is across the bone at a right angle. Avulsed…

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When you have pain, whether it’s joint, osteoarthritis or chronic pain, sometimes all you want to do is lie in bed and not move. I’ve been there. There are days where my hip flares up and it’s tiring and distracting.  (I live with osteoarthritis in my hip). But when you have this pain, exercise is a must.  Why?  Research shows that exercise improves your pain threshold. You see, with chronic pain, your pain threshold drops.  This means that it takes less pain to make you feel more uncomfortable. But when you exercise, strengthen your muscles and increase flexibility, your pain threshold improves! How Exercise Can Easily Relieve Your Chronic Pain Studies show that stretching can increase your joints’ range of motion. This not only helps you fight through stiffness, but it can also protect from any wear and tear. “The…

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A new vitamin D study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has revealed that vitamin D does not reduce your risk of falling.¹ In fact, it may increase it! At least that’s what it seems like on the surface… What The Study Found When It Came to Falls This one-year, double-blind, randomized clinical trial, conducted in Zurich, Switzerland, included 200 men and women. There were three study groups with monthly treatments of vitamin D3: The high-dose group received 60,000 IU/month of vitamin D3. The middle-dose group received 24,000 IU/month of vitamin D3, plus 300 mcg of pre-formed calcidiol. (This is the form of vitamin D3 after activation in the liver. This makes it 5 times more potent than D3, but still not in its final hormonally active form) The low-dose group received 24,000 IU/month of vitamin D3.…

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