Nutrition / April 19, 2012

If you are not among those who are allergic to soy or have been diagnosed as having hypothyroidism, soy foods can be a great addition to your bone-building diet. Not only are soy foods excellent sources of magnesium and vitamin K1 (plus many are fortified with calcium), but they contain active compounds called isoflavones – genistein and ipriflavone, specifically — that greatly help lessen the activation of osteoclasts, the cells that break down bone. Genistein improves the RANKL/OPG Ratio What’s the RANKL/OPG ratio? To explain this, we need to take a little trip “behind the scenes” for a look at these two molecules, one of which, RANKL, initiates a series of events that results in the production of osteoclasts ready to remove old bone, and another one, OPG, that shuts down this process. When RANKL, which stands for receptor activator…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / February 14, 2012

A study on menopausal women in Europe has scientists reveal that as high as 70% of women in this category have low Vitamin D levels. The dip in percentage is very significant and has shocked the European medical fraternity.  This especially so because the percentage is seeing a steady dip without a reversing trend despite increased awareness among women in the last decade over the importance of Vitamin D and it’s bearing on bone health. As per the experts, a good level to be aimed at by menopausal women would be over 30 ng/ml (or nanograms per millilitre). This is also corroborated by the recommendation made by the Office of Dietary Supplements on Vitamin D. They clearly state that persons are potentially at risk for inadequacy at levels ranging from 12–20 ng/mL and that all people are sufficient at levels…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / January 10, 2012

A recent study conducted by the orthopaedic surgeons at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that those spinal fusion surgery patients who were deficient in Vitamin D before the surgery had a long recovery phase. Spinal fusion surgery is a major surgery that is usually recommended to remove the spinal canal of bone and tissue material obstructing/narrowing the canal or squeezing the spinal cord. The surgery lasts several hours and is also prescribed to correct fractures of the spine and treat herniated discs, tumors etc. (1) The findings of the Washington University School of Medicine were presented in the 26th Annual Meeting of the North American Spine Society. The study had examined 313 spinal fusion surgery patients and found that more than 50% of them had low Vitamin D levels that made the recovery phase for…

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Nutrition / Research / Strontium / January 10, 2012

Osteopenia and osteoporosis patients are often confused when their doctor recommends strontium for them. Patients then typically read up information about strontium, come across sensational write ups that misinform and create fear for Strontium. Doctors usually prescribe either of the two variants strontium ranelate or strontium citrate. After doing some of their own spade work, patients then begin to wonder why they were not prescribed the other form. First let’s begin by dispelling the fear of strontium. Strontium is a naturally occurring silvery white or yellowish mineral found in the soil, and it has some serious health benefits. People who consume organic and farm produce usually get enough of this mineral and do not require strontium supplements. You can find out more about strontium-rich foods on our dedicated strontium food sources page. In it’s natural state strontium is a stable…

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Nutrition / Nutrition / December 13, 2011

Americans spend $27 billion on dietary supplements, according to the Council for Responsible Nutrition, and supplement use is on the rise.  According to the CDC between 1988 and 1994 one third of the population took a supplement.  By 2006, over half the population was taking a supplement. In women over aged 60, calcium supplement usage has increased exponentially.  Between 1988-1994 only 28% of women aged 60+ were taking calcium, but between 2003 and 2006 that percentage had grown to 61%. Supplements can be an excellent way to fill in dietary gaps and imbalances, as long as they are high quality.  Buying the cheapest supplement on the shelf will likely backfire, as many nutritional supplements use the lowest cost ingredients, or are lacking the necessary co-factors for absorption. The cheapest calcium supplement at the drugstore will probably be a form of calcium that is not…

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Nutrition / Nutrition / December 13, 2011

Overweight and obese premenopausal women who are on severe diets can now draw hope from the recent findings which show that increasing the proportion of dairy foods in their diet could keep their calorie count low and yet not affect their bone health adversely. Studies on bone mass conducted several years ago showed that a higher body weight contributed towards greater bone mass and so when persons go on diet to curb weight gain or reduce weight, they compromise their bone health. Though effects of factors such as dairy intake (for calcium and protein) and exercise on bone health were individually studied independent of each other, there were no cases that observed their combined effect on overweight and obese premenopausal women. Now, a new study conducted by the McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario has a report which has been accepted…

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Nutrition / Omega 3 / Research / December 2, 2011

Latest research conducted by a team of scientists at the University of Bristol shows that there are signs of an omega 3 osteoarthritis link. How so? Osteoarthritis seems to be greatly reduced by the intake of Omega 3 found in fish oils. The study points that the difference fish oil omega 3 makes to symptoms of osteoarthritis are both significant and substantial. How the Omega 3 Osteoarthritis Connection Works Osteoarthritis (or degenerative joint disease) is a type of arthritis where there is a breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in one or more joints of our limbs. The cause of the disease is not yet known. However, wear and tear of joints, heredity, obesity and occurrence of fracture could trigger the condition. The treatment is limited to pain relief and joint replacement. (1) The University of Bristol study (funded by Arthritis…

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Nutrition / October 14, 2011

Did you ever think that there would be a connection between the gluten intolerance (in either forms of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease) and osteoporosis? Well studies suggest there is and a positive correlation at that. Currently the conventional treatment basket for osteopenia (early stage/milder osteoporosis) and osteoporosis contains a calcium rich diet along with

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Magnesium / Nutrition / Research / October 14, 2011

As per Dr. Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, magnesium expert and Medical Director of the non-profit Nutritional Magnesium Association, the benefits that can be had from taking calcium (through diet or supplements) to improve and maintain good bone health can be impaired without a corresponding adequate intake of magnesium. In short, there is a fascinating link between magnesium deficiency and osteoporosis As per her, a 1:1 ratio for calcium-magnesium is necessary to reap the benefits of calcium intake for bone health. It is believed that magnesium keeps the calcium dissolved in the blood which without the former (magnesium) would calcify leaving deposits in the kidney causing stones or even calcification of cardiovascular arteries and bone joints. (1) Dr. Dean clearly outlined the magnesium-Vitamin D-calcium relationship that is so important for optimal absorption and metabolism of calcium. She was quoted as saying,…

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Nutrition / Research / Vitamin D3 / October 14, 2011

Vitamin D is a prohormone of the secosteroid type. It acts as a precursor to what makes a hormone or is a hormone prototype, if you will. Usually exposure to sunlight helps our body (skin in particular) to synthesize Vitamin D. The epidermal layers of Stratum basale and Stratum Spinosum produce maximum amount of a particular type of a pre-vitamin D3. It is fat-soluble in nature. So how is Vitamin D and bone health related? Vitamin D is metabolised by the liver and the kidneys and is converted to a hormone called Calcitonin. Calcitrol ensures that there is enough calcium in the blood to help form bones, teeth and maintain bone density. When ultra-violet rays shine on our skin, a cholesterol-like substance gets converted to Vitamin D and absorbed into the blood. Vitamin D is required for the metabolisation of…

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