Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 15, 2012

A study from Columbia University College of Dental Medicine warns that patients who were on long term bisphosphonates medication for treating osteoporosis were at risk of developing necrosis of bones in the jaw if they carried a variation of a particular gene. It was also a caution to doctors to have their osteoporosis patients checked for this gene variation before prescribing long-term or high doses of bisphosphonates for them. (1) So what is osteonecrosis? Osteonecrosis is a disease caused by decreased blood flow to the bones and the joints. When there is limited blood flow your bone begins to break down and die. Bisphosphonates are a common class of drug that bind to the bone of the patient taking them and inhibits the production of cells called osteoclasts which are responsible for the breakdown and resorption of bone. They are…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 15, 2012

The effect leukemia has on the bones of cancer patients has been studied by researchers at the University of Rochester and a new perspective which is both thought-provoking and has surprise element to it has been arrived at. The study further sparks potential that therapies which treat bone disorders could aid in the treatment of leukemia. It also lays the foundations of a possible path that newly diagnosed leukemia patients be screened for osteoporosis. (1) Leukemia is a form of blood or bone marrow cancer in which there is an abnormal increase in the production of white blood cells. According to the Leukemia Research Foundation approximately 74,000 people in the U.S will have leukemia diagnosed for them out of which 21,000 may die of the disease.  (2) Blood stem cells are multi-potent in nature and give rise to all types…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 1, 2012

More insights were had on the possible development of osteoporosis through a study of deer antlers by researchers at Research Institute of Hunting Resources (University of Castilla La Mancha), Spain. We have long been reading literature about how important Vitamin D and magnesium are to calcium metabolization. This new study shows another dietary mineral plays a vital role in the osteoporosis equation and that is manganese. The study of deer antlers began when there was a marked increase in the reported breakage of deer antlers in 2005 in Spain. The study pointed out that it was not really the deficiency of dietary calcium that made antlers in deer weak, but low levels of dietary manganese caused the calcium to not ‘stick’ as it were causing poor quality antlers. In that particular year, due to an abnormally cold winter, the plants…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / March 1, 2012

A study conducted by the American College of Rheumatology over more than a decade brings out a fact that would startle many: 63% of women over 50 years of age experience either incidental, intermittent or persistent knee pain. Even more shocking is that as many as 27 million women over 25 years of age suffer from osteoarthritis in the US alone. Most likely direct causes have been found in being overweight, having a history of knee injury or early onset of radiographic osteoarthritis. The findings of this study has been published in the Wiley-Blackwell publication Arthritis & rheumatism and has set the medical fraternity abuzz with what the realities are and what they have to deal with in terms of management of the condition. Osteoarthritis is a joint disorder that occurs as we age and is generally caused by gradual…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Treatment / February 14, 2012

A small team of researchers from Cleveland’s Case Western Reserve University have put together a package that encases material that is identical to the ingredients that allow bone to re-grow and heal where there are injuries. The package is placed where bone needs to heal. The package is used as a storage and delivery tool for the nature-alike material to the fractures. (1) It has been observed that following this method of delivery heals serious bone injuries faster than any of the current methods used worldwide. The new technique also helps heal bone wounds that have no chance of healing if left to it’s own devices and such injuries where bone re-growth is expected to be very slow. As per Melissa Knothe Tate, a joint professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical & aerospace engineering at Case Western Reserve University, “We’re…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / January 3, 2012

The anatomical structure and the working of a ‘molecular motor’ has now been identified whose malfunctioning is believed to be responsible for the onset of many critical diseases and health conditions such as osteoporosis and even cancer. The motor is an energy-converting protein known as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Every cell in our body contains this cell which is used to produce energy for the organs for our body to function. The ATP synthase protein interacts with the fatty acids that surround it. The fatty acids form membranes around each cell giving the cell mechanical protection from physical shock. It also provides structural support for the cell as well as acts as a semi-permeable barrier to other surrounding cells. The function of the fatty acids is to act like a lubricant for the functioning of this molecular motor. (1) The…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Exercise / Research / December 13, 2011

While most of the focus on obesity is from the perspective of the risks it adds to a person’s cardiovascular health, chances of developing diabetes, sleep apnea, certain cancer types and other medical conditions, it has now come to light that obesity also plays a major role in pegging your risk of developing osteoporosis and osteoarthritis later in life. Researchers from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy (Gothenburg University) have carried out a study which revealed that the body’s obesity-related hormone called adiponectin was responsible for increased risk of fractures as well as osteoporosis. (1) Obesity is an adverse medical condition where the body accumulates excessive fat and puts it to risk for various health problems and in some cases life expectancy. Obesity is usually managed by improving the lifestyle of the effected person through better eating habits, improving food quality, exercising and…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / December 2, 2011

Research from Case Western University now suggests that most humans are doomed to develop backbone fractures as they age and evolution from apes to humans is to blame. Though osteoporosis is often cited as the cause for backbone fractures, the researchers at the university find the structure of our spine the real culprit. (1) If we take a look at the anatomy of our vertebrae or backbone and compare it with that of apes, we will see that our backbone is more porous than apes. It is also much larger than their’s. However, unlike apes, our backbone is encased in a significantly thinner case of shell made of bone. In apes, the encasing shell is much thicker and so it remains intact for longer even as apes age. As long as humans are young and the bone loss phenomenon has…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Experts / Research / Video / November 23, 2011

Scientists at the Canada’s Intitut De Recherches Cliniques De Montreal have discovered a gene that they believe has controlling influence on bone mass of an individual thus proving critical to predisposing a person to osteoporosis. (1) The study was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and it’s findings were published in the October issue of Cell Metabolism. The research team was trying to find out about the mechanisms that were involved in bone formation and bone mineral dissolution causing bone breakdown. Bone formation was brought on by the production of bone cells called osteoblasts. Dissolution of bone known as resorption of bone was caused by the manufacture of bone cells called osteoclasts. These two types of bone cells work in tandem which reshapes the bones and…

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Bone-Healthy Living / Research / November 16, 2011

Stem cells are biological cells that may develop into many different types of cells in the body in its early stages of development. They are known to serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing without limit to replenish other cells as and when required.(1) Now a study conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology shows that it is possible to ‘induce’ stem cells to develop into a certain specific type of cell just by controlling their shape. This has immensely beneficial implications in the field of osteoporosis treatment as it points at designing material which will help regeneration of lost or damaged tissues in the body.(2) It is known that in the realms of tissue-engineering, the primary objective is to repair as well as regenerate partially lost or damaged body tissues. This is done using stem…

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